1. Bækur og afþreying
  2. Bækur og kort
  3. Rafbækur
  4. Viðskipta- og hagfræði
  5. Stjórnun

Strategic Management

Vörumerki: John Wiley
Vörunúmer: 9781118102459
Rafræn bók. Uppl. sendar á netfangið þitt eftir kaup

Veldu vöru

7.990 kr.

Strategic Management

Veldu vöru

Rafræn bók. Uppl. sendar á netfangið þitt eftir kaup
Rafbók til leigu í 1 ár. Útgáfa: 1

Efnisyfirlit

  • Front Matter
    • Dedication
    • PREFACE
  • CHAPTER 1 INTRODUCTION
    • 1.1 STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT
    • 1.2 THE ROLE OF BUSINESS STRATEGY
      • FIGURE 1-1 Strategic Management
      • Examples: Dell Computer and Compaq Computer
      • The Dynamics of Business Strategy
        • FIGURE 1-2 Dynamics of Business Strategy
      • Strategic Planning versus Strategic Thinking
    • 1.3 THE ORGANIZATION AND ITS OBJECTIVES
      • Performance: Overarching Objectives
      • Firms and Managers
    • 1.4 PERSPECTIVES ON THE IMPACT OF THE GENERAL MANAGER
    • 1.5 ORGANIZATION OF THE BOOK
  • CHAPTER 2 BUSINESS STRATEGY
    • 2.1 INTRODUCTION
    • 2.2 DESCRIBING BUSINESS STRATEGY
      • FIGURE 2-1 Dynamics of Business Strategy
      • Goals
      • Scope
      • Competitive Advantage
      • Logic
        • FIGURE 2-2 The Logic of the More Complete Strategy
    • 2.3 RELATIONSHIP OF STRATEGY TO MISSION, PURPOSE, VALUES, AND VISION
      • Mission, Purpose, and Values
        • FIGURE 2-3 Charter, Mission, and Values Statement of Sunrise Medical
        • FIGURE 2-4 A Mission Statement
        • FIGURE 2-5 A Statement of Values
      • Vision
    • 2.4 THE STRATEGY STATEMENT
      • Benefits of an Explicit Strategy Statement
      • The Form and Use of the Strategy Statement
      • An Example: Borders Books
        • FIGURE 2-6 Strategy Statement for Borders, Inc.
    • 2.5 DEVELOPING STRATEGY: THE STRATEGY PROCESS
      • FIGURE 2-7 Steps in Setting Strategy
      • Strategy Identification
      • Strategy Evaluation: Testing the Logic
      • Strategy Process and Strategic Change
    • 2.6 SUMMARY
  • CHAPTER 3 COMPETITIVE ADVANTAGE
    • 3.1 INTRODUCTION
    • 3.2 VALUE AND COMPETITIVE ADVANTAGE
      • FIGURE 3-1 Sources of Competitive Advantage
    • 3.3 TWO MAIN ROUTES TO COMPETITIVE ADVANTAGE
      • Position
        • Examples of Positional Advantage
      • Capabilities
    • 3.4 SUSTAINABLE COMPETITIVE ADVANTAGE
      • Capability as Sustainable Competitive Advantage
        • FIGURE 3-2 Sources of Causal Ambiguity
      • Position as Sustainable Competitive Advantage
    • 3.5 THE RELATIONSHIP OF POSITION TO CAPABILITIES
      • FIGURE 3-3 Capabilities and Position Interact
    • 3.6 POSITION, CAPABILITIES, AND “THE RESOURCE-BASED VIEW OF THE FIRM”
    • 3.7 THE COST-QUALITY FRONTIER AND COMPETITIVE ADVANTAGE
      • Product Quality and Cost
      • A Cost–Quality Framework
        • FIGURE 3-4 The Cost and Perceived Quality Framework
      • Using the Cost–Quality Frontier to Illustrate Competitive Advantage: An Example
        • FIGURE 3-5 Using the Cost-Quality Framework to Map Competition
        • FIGURE 3-6 Firm B Has a Competitive Advantage over Firm D
    • 3.8 SUMMARY
  • CHAPTER 4 INTERNAL CONTEXT: ORGANIZATION DESIGN
    • 4.1 INTRODUCTION
    • 4.2 ORGANIZATION DESIGN AND COMPETITIVE ADVANTAGE
      • FIGURE 4-1 Sources of Competitive Advantage
      • FIGURE 4-2 Organization and Competitive Advantage
    • 4.3 STRATEGY AND ORGANIZATION AT SOUTHWEST AIRLINES
      • Southwest's Strategy and Performance
      • Southwest's Organization
      • Comparisons to Other Airlines
      • Summary: Consistency and Alignment
    • 4.4 THE CHALLENGE OF ORGANIZATION DESIGN
      • The Coordination Problem
      • The Incentive Problem
    • 4.5 MEETING THE CHALLENGE
      • FIGURE 4-3 Elements of Organizational Design
      • Architecture: Structure
        • FIGURE 4-4 A Functional Architecture
        • FIGURE 4-5 A Divisional Architecture
        • Examples of Horizontal Linkages
      • Architecture: Compensation and Rewards
      • Routines
      • Culture
    • 4.6 ARC ANALYSIS
      • FIGURE 4-6 ARC Analysis: Building an Effective Organization
    • 4.7 SUMMARY
      • FIGURE 4-7 ARC Analysis Questions
  • CHAPTER 5 ORGANIZATION AND COMPETITIVE ADVANTAGE
    • 5.1 INTRODUCTION
    • 5.2 ALIGNING STRATEGY AND ORGANIZATION
      • FIGURE 5-1 The Link between Internal Context and Competitive Advantage
      • FIGURE 5-2 Strategic Alignment
      • Applying ARC Analysis to Assess Strategic Alignment: Southwest Airlines Revisited
        • FIGURE 5-3 An Abbreviated Analysis of Southwest Airlines
      • Other Examples: Sony, Apple Computer, and Silicon Graphics
    • 5.3 BUILDING AND CREATING COMPETITIVE ADVANTAGE
      • FIGURE 5-4 Strategic Alignment Implications
      • Explorers and Exploiters
      • Interdependence and Tight-Coupling
      • Organizational Slack
      • Central Direction
      • The ARC of Explorers and Exploiters
        • TABLE 5-1 Explorer and Exploiter Profiles
    • 5.4 COMBINING EXPLORATION AND EXPLOITATION
    • 5.5 COSTS OF ORGANIZATIONAL CHANGE
    • 5.6 SUMMARY
  • CHAPTER 6 EXTERNAL CONTEXT: INDUSTRY ANALYSIS
    • 6.1 INTRODUCTION
    • 6.2 THE EFFECTS OF INDUSTRY CHARACTERISTICS ON FIRM PERFORMANCE
      • FIGURE 6-1 Ratio of Market to Asset Value for Selected Industries
      • FIGURE 6-2 Ratio of Market Value to Asset Value for Steel and Selected Steel Manufacturers
    • 6.3 ORGANIZING INDUSTRY ANALYSIS
      • FIGURE 6-3 The Structure-Conduct-Performance Paradigm
      • FIGURE 6-4 Porter's “Five Forces” Industry Analysis Framework
    • 6.4 A FRAMEWORK FOR INDUSTRY ANALYSIS
      • FIGURE 6-5 An Illustrative Value Chain
      • Value Creation: Potential Industry Earnings (PIE)
        • FIGURE 6-6 Potential Industry Earnings in a Simple Value Chain
      • Determinants of PIE
        • FIGURE 6-7 Forces that Increase Potential Industry Earnings (PIE)
      • An Example of Value Creation: Lobster PIE
        • FIGURE 6-8 Potential Industry Earnings (PIE) for the Lobster Industry
        • FIGURE 6-9 Incremental Opportunity Cost in the Lobster Industry Value Chain
      • Capturing Value: Dividing PIE
      • Competition
        • FIGURE 6-10 Forces Increasing the Share of PIE Retained by Incumbents
      • Entry and Incumbency Advantage
      • An Example of the Effects of Competition and Entry
        • FIGURE 6-11 Entry and Price in the Pharmaceutical Industry
      • Vertical Power: Buyer or Supplier Power
      • Dividing the Lobster PIE
        • FIGURE 6-12 Revenues and Profit in the Lobster Industry
    • 6.5 INDUSTRY DEFINITION
      • Industry Definition Based on “Close” Substitutes
      • Industry Definitions for Systems of Complementary Products
    • 6.6 SUMMARY
  • CHAPTER 7 THE SPECTRUM OF COMPETITION AND NICHE MARKETS
    • 7.1 INTRODUCTION
    • 7.2 THE SPECTRUM OF COMPETITION
      • FIGURE 7-1 The Spectrum of Competition
      • Structure and Behavior
    • 7.3 NICHE MARKETS AND PRODUCT DIFFERENTIATION
      • Building, Defending, and Exploiting a Market Niche: Benetton and The Gap
    • 7.4 CONSUMER PREFERENCES AND PRODUCT DIFFERENTIATION
      • Preferences and Products
        • FIGURE 7-2 Consumer Preference for Cereal “Crunchiness”
        • FIGURE 7-3 Location of Cereal Brands
        • FIGURE 7-4 Mapping the U.S. Automotive Market
      • Horizontal and Vertical Product Differentiation
    • 7.5 DIFFERENTIATION AND COMPETITION
      • Niches and Neighbors
        • TABLE 7-1 Segmentation in the Personal Computer Industry
      • Differentiation Softens Competition
      • Price Competition and Market Share
        • TABLE 7-2 Illustration of Product Demand, Price, and Product Differentiation (Competitor's Price = 1.00)
    • 7.6 PRODUCT POSITIONING
    • 7.7 SUMMARY
    • APPENDIX: MONOPOLY, COMPETITION, AND NICHE MARKETS
      • Monopoly
        • FIGURE 7A-1 Monopoly Firm
      • Perfect Competition
        • FIGURE 7A-2 Competitive Firm
      • Niche Markets
        • FIGURE 7A-3 The Market for Cheerios When It Faces No Nearby Competitors
        • FIGURE 7A-4 Effects of Differentiation on Sales
        • FIGURE 7A-5 Cheerios Monopoly Charging a Price = p
        • FIGURE 7A-6 Cheerios Charges Price = p When Its Competitors Charge Price = 0
  • CHAPTER 8 COMPETITION IN CONCENTRATED MARKETS
    • 8.1 INTRODUCTION
    • 8.2 OLIGOPOLY: THE ELEMENTS OF STRATEGIC INTERACTION
      • FIGURE 8-1 Elements of Strategic Interaction
      • Differences in Actions
        • TABLE 8-1 The Demand for Fish and Industry Revenue
        • TABLE 8-2 How Many Fish to Catch: Firm Profits for Each Level of Outputs
      • Timing
      • Players
      • Information
      • Repetition
        • TABLE 8-3 The Incentive to Cheat by Lowering Price
        • TABLE 8-4 Stock Market Response to “Simplified Pricing”
      • Summary
    • 8.3 DOMINANT FIRMS
    • 8.4 ANTITRUST
      • Collusion and Antitrust
    • 8.5 SUMMARY
  • CHAPTER 9 ENTRY AND THE ADVANTAGE OF INCUMBENCY
    • 9.1 INTRODUCTION
      • FIGURE 9-1 Entry Barriers Increase the Share of PIE Retained by Incumbents
    • 9.2 TYPES OF INCUMBENCY ADVANTAGE
      • Scale Advantages
        • FIGURE 9-2 Fixed and Variable Costs
        • FIGURE 9-3 Covering Fixed Costs
        • FIGURE 9-4 Covering Fixed Costs with Two Firms
        • FIGURE 9-5 Long-run Economies of Scale
      • Incumbency Advantage from Cumulative Investment
        • Learning Economies
          • FIGURE 9-6 An Example of Learning Economies
          • FIGURE 9-7 Learning Economies as a Barrier to Entry
        • Innovation Advantage
        • Promotional Advantage
      • Incumbency Advantage from Consumer Loyalty
      • Incumbency Advantage from Switching Costs and Demand-Side Increasing Returns
      • Incumbency Advantage from Sunk Costs
      • Firm Scope
    • 9.3 ENTRY BARRIERS AT WORK
      • TABLE 9-1 Entry Thresholds in Small Towns
    • 9.4 STRATEGICALLY CREATING INCUMBENCY ADVANTAGE
      • Packing the Product Space
        • FIGURE 9-8 The Entry Blocking Investment Decision
        • FIGURE 9-9 Payoffs in the Entry Blocking Decision
      • Blocking Entry through Contract or Vertical Integration
      • Signaling to Prevent Entry
      • Entry Barriers and Antitrust
    • 9.5 SUMMARY
  • CHAPTER 10 CREATING AND CAPTURING VALUE IN THE VALUE CHAIN
    • 10.1 INTRODUCTION
    • 10.2 VALUE CREATION AND VALUE CAPTURE
      • FIGURE 10-1 A Stronger Vertical Position Increases the Share of PIE Incumbents Retain
      • FIGURE 10-2 Creating Value Increases the Size of the PIE and the Size of the Firm's Slice
    • 10.3 THE VALUE CHAIN AND BUYER OR SUPPLY POWER
      • FIGURE 10-3 A Value Chain
    • 10.4 CAPTURING VALUE
      • Value Capture without Buyer or Supplier Power
        • TABLE 10-1 Value Creation and Capture in a Chain with No Buyer or Supplier Powera
      • Value Capture by a Single Powerful Supplier (or Buyer)
        • TABLE 10-2 Value Creation and Capture with a Single Monopolista
      • Value Capture When Buyers and Suppliers Are Powerful
        • Double Marginalization
        • Bargaining between Powerful Buyers and Suppliers
          • TABLE 10-3 Value Allocation When Each Firm Has a Monopoly Positiona
      • Reducing Power in Other Segments
    • 10.5 CREATING VALUE
      • Opportunities for Creating Value: The Coordination Problem
      • Contracting to Create Value: The Incentive Problem
    • 10.6 SUMMARY
    • APPENDIX: PRICE DISCRIMINATION
      • TABLE 10-A1 Separating Consumers by Their Preferences for Quality
      • TABLE 10-A2 The Effect of Bundling
  • CHAPTER 11 STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT IN A CHANGING ENVIRONMENT
    • 11.1 INTRODUCTION
      • FIGURE 11-1 Dynamics of Business Strategy
    • 11.2 THE EVOLUTION OF THE U.S. AUTOMOBILE INDUSTRY1
    • 11.3 CHANGE AND COMPETITIVE ADVANTAGE
      • FIGURE 11-2 Change and Competitive Advantage
    • 11.4 INDUSTRY LIFE CYCLE
      • Emergence
        • FIGURE 11-3 The Industry Life Cycle
      • Growth
      • Maturity and Decline
        • TABLE 11-1 Company and Plant Concentration, 1947–1992
        • TABLE 11-2 Surviving Breweries by Capacity, 1959–1992
    • 11.5 THE EVOLUTION OF INDUSTRY ORGANIZATION
      • Horizontal vs. Vertical Organization
        • FIGURE 11-4 The “Old” Computer Industry
        • FIGURE 11-5 The “New” Computer Industry
      • Organizational Implications of Industry Structure
    • 11.6 MANAGING STRATEGIC CHANGE
      • Overcoming the Barriers to Strategic Change
        • FIGURE 11-6 Organization Designs for Corporate Entrepreneurship
      • Managing Under Uncertainty: Scenario Analysis
      • Strategic Change: An Example
    • SUMMARY
  • CHAPTER 12 STRATEGY IN MARKETS WITH DEMAND-SIDE INCREASING RETURNS
    • 12.1 INTRODUCTION
    • 12.2 SOURCES OF DEMAND-SIDE INCREASING RETURNS (DSIR)
      • Compatibility Benefits
      • Network Benefits
        • FIGURE 12-1 Dilbert Is an Early Videophone Adopter
        • FIGURE 12-2 The Network Effect
        • FIGURE 12-3 A “Star” Network in Banking
    • 12.3 COMPETITION IN MARKETS WITH DEMAND-SIDE INCREASING RETURNS
      • Installed Base and Tipping
        • FIGURE 12-4 Positive Feedback
      • Competitive Strategies for Building DSIR
    • 12.4 SYSTEMS OF COMPONENTS
      • System Compatibility
      • Leveraging Market Position
        • FIGURE 12-5 Domino Has a DSIR Advantage from Dominating Component 1
        • FIGURE 12-6 A New, Intermediate, Layer Emerges
    • 12.5 TECHNOLOGY ADOPTION
      • FIGURE 12-7 Illustrative Adoption Pattern
    • 12.6 MANAGING THE ADOPTION PROCESS
      • FIGURE 12-8 An Alternative Adoption Pattern
      • Marketing to Create Momentum
      • Leveraging Reputation
      • Committing to “Open” Standards
      • Winning Over An Influential Buyer
      • Advance Sign-Ups
      • Winks at Pirates
      • Leasing
      • Price Commitments
    • 12.7 STANDARDS-SETTING PROCESSES
    • 12.8 SUMMARY
  • CHAPTER 13 GLOBALIZATION AND STRATEGY
    • 13.1 INTRODUCTION
    • 13.2 IMPLICATIONS FOR MANAGERS
      • FIGURE 13-1 Sources of Competitive Advantage
    • 13.3 STRATEGIC GAINS FROM GLOBALIZATION
    • 13.4 GLOBALIZATION OF INDUSTRIES AND ECONOMIES
    • 13.5 STRATEGIC CHALLENGES
      • The Challenge of Local Responsiveness
        • FIGURE 13-2 Distribution of Selected Countries on Individualism-Collectivism and Power Distance Scales
      • The Challenge of Global Efficiency
      • The Challenge of Learning
        • FIGURE 13-3 The Relationship between Wages and Productivity
    • 13.6 ORGANIZING TO MEET THE CHALLENGE
      • Federated vs. Centralized
      • Building the Middle Ground
      • The Regional Organization
      • Locational Advantage
        • FIGURE 13-4 Selected Location-Based Determinants of Competitive Advantage: The “Diamond”
      • The Transnational Corporation
    • 13.7 SUMMARY
  • CHAPTER 14 CORPORATE STRATEGY: MANAGING FOR VALUE IN A MULTIBUSINESS COMPANY
    • 14.1 INTRODUCTION
      • FIGURE 14-1 Business Unit Strategy
    • 14.2 A FRAMEWORK FOR CORPORATE STRATEGY
      • FIGURE 14-2 The Multibusiness Firm
      • Managing Strategic Spillovers
        • FIGURE 14-3 Business Unit Spillovers
      • A Framework for Corporate Strategy
        • FIGURE 14-4 Adding Value in a Multibusiness Company
    • 14.3 DOES CORPORATE ADD VALUE?
      • The Performance of Diversified Firms
    • 14.4 STRATEGIC SPILLOVERS AND COMPETITIVE ADVANTAGE
      • Identifying and Managing Spillovers
      • Sources of Spillovers
        • FIGURE 14-5 Managing Strategic Spillovers
    • 14.5 LEVERS: RESOURCE ALLOCATION AND ORGANIZATION DESIGN
      • Resource Allocation
        • Allocating Financial Capital
        • Allocating Human Capital
      • Organization Design
        • Architecture and Firm Performance
        • Routines for Information and Influence
        • Routines and Norms for Intervention
      • Corporate Direction
    • 14.6 SUMMARY
  • CHAPTER 15 THE STRATEGY PROCESS
    • 15.1 INTRODUCTION
    • 15.2 SOME PRINCIPLES OF THE STRATEGY PROCESS
    • 15.3 BUSINESS STRATEGY PROCESS
      • FIGURE 15-1 Steps in Setting Business Strategy
      • Strategy Identification
      • Strategy Evaluation
        • Internal
        • External
      • Developing and Evaluating Strategic Options
        • FIGURE 15-2 Inputs to Strategy Evaluation
      • Selecting and Communicating the Strategy
      • Strategy Process in a Rapidly Changing Environment
    • 15.4 STRATEGIC PLANS
      • FIGURE 15-3 Examples of Major Directions, Objectives, Actions, and Benchmarks
    • 15.5 THE EVOLUTION OF STRATEGY
      • Autonomous and Intentional Strategic Changes
    • 15.6 CORPORATE STRATEGY PROCESSES
      • Corporate Strategy Processes for Strategically Independent Businesses
        • FIGURE 15-4 Corporate Strategy Process When Business Units Are Strategically Independent
        • FIGURE 15-5 The McKinsey–GE Investment Priority Screen
        • FIGURE 15-6 The BCG Typology for Assessing Investment Opportunities Facing a Diversified Firm
      • Corporate Strategy for Strategically Interdependent Businesses
        • FIGURE 15-7 Expanded Corporate Strategy Process
      • The Role of General Managers
    • 15.7 CONCLUDING REMARKS
  • Back Matter
    • APPENDIX APPLYING GAME THEORY TO STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT
      • A.1 INTRODUCTION
      • A.2 A FAMOUS EXAMPLE: THE PRISONERS' DILEMMA
        • FIGURE A-1 Expected Jail Time in the Prisoners’ Dilemma
        • FIGURE A-2 Payoffs for the Battle of the Sexes
      • A.3 NASH EQUILIBRIUM AND DUOPOLY
        • FIGURE A-3 Best-Response Functions
      • A.4 THE EFFECT OF REPETITION
      • A.5 CREDIBILITY, COMMITMENT, AND FLEXIBILITY
        • The Value of Flexibility: Real Options
        • Commitment and Credibility
          • FIGURE A-4 Payoffs in the Entry Game
          • FIGURE A-5 The Extensive Form of the Entry Game
          • FIGURE A-6 The Extensive Form of the Modified Entry Game
      • A.6 STRATEGIC BEHAVIOR IN THE PRESENCE OF ASYMMETRIC INFORMATION
        • Signaling
        • Screening
        • Reputation
      • A.7 SUMMARY
    • CREDITS
    • INDEX

    UM RAFBÆKUR Á HEIMKAUP.IS

    Bókahillan þín er þitt svæði og þar eru bækurnar þínar geymdar. Þú kemst í bókahilluna þína hvar og hvenær sem er í tölvu eða snjalltæki. Einfalt og þægilegt!

    Rafbók til eignar
    Rafbók til eignar þarf að hlaða niður á þau tæki sem þú vilt nota innan eins árs frá því bókin er keypt.

    Þú kemst í bækurnar hvar sem er
    Þú getur nálgast allar raf(skóla)bækurnar þínar á einu augabragði, hvar og hvenær sem er í bókahillunni þinni. Engin taska, enginn kyndill og ekkert vesen (hvað þá yfirvigt).

    Auðvelt að fletta og leita
    Þú getur flakkað milli síðna og kafla eins og þér hentar best og farið beint í ákveðna kafla úr efnisyfirlitinu. Í leitinni finnur þú orð, kafla eða síður í einum smelli.

    Glósur og yfirstrikanir
    Þú getur auðkennt textabrot með mismunandi litum og skrifað glósur að vild í rafbókina. Þú getur jafnvel séð glósur og yfirstrikanir hjá bekkjarsystkinum og kennara ef þeir leyfa það. Allt á einum stað.

    Hvað viltu sjá? / Þú ræður hvernig síðan lítur út
    Þú lagar síðuna að þínum þörfum. Stækkaðu eða minnkaðu myndir og texta með multi-level zoom til að sjá síðuna eins og þér hentar best í þínu námi.



    Fleiri góðir kostir
    - Þú getur prentað síður úr bókinni (innan þeirra marka sem útgefandinn setur)
    - Möguleiki á tengingu við annað stafrænt og gagnvirkt efni, svo sem myndbönd eða spurningar úr efninu
    - Auðvelt að afrita og líma efni/texta fyrir t.d. heimaverkefni eða ritgerðir
    - Styður tækni sem hjálpar nemendum með sjón- eða heyrnarskerðingu
Eiginleikar
Vörumerki: John Wiley
Vörunúmer: 9781118102459
Taka af óskalista
Setja á óskalista

Umsagnir

Engar umsagnir
Lesa fleiri umsagnir
7.990 kr.