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Principles of Behavior

Vörumerki: Taylor and Francis
Vörunúmer: 9781000367003
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Principles of Behavior

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Efnisyfirlit

  • Cover
  • Half Title
  • Title
  • Copyright
  • Brief Contents
  • Detailed Contents
  • Preface
  • PART I: RESPONDENT CONDITIONING
    • CHAPTER 1 Respondent Conditioning
      • Batman: Behavioral Clinical Psychology/Behavioral Counseling
      • Phobias
      • Ivan Pavlov
      • Respondent Conditioning
        • Fear and Football
      • Conditioning A Phobia with Little Albert
      • Higher-Order Respondent Conditioning
      • Respondent Extinction
      • Phil’s Phobia
      • Systematic Desensitization
      • Jazmyn’s Story: Behavioral Clinical Psychology
      • Sid Kicks the Sugar Monkey: Respondent Conditioning and The Body’s Regulatory Systems
      • Why Drug Addicts Overdose: Behavioral Pharmacology
        • How to Use the Study Questions
        • In Defense of Easy Questions and Tedious Memorization
        • How to Read Textbooks
  • PART II: OPERANT CONDITIONING
    • CHAPTER 2 Operant Conditioning for Dummies Part I
      • Back in The Day
      • As Weird as Sex
      • Becoming a BCBA—First Step
      • Family Life—Part I (B-4): Behavioral Child and Family Counseling
      • The Grandfather (B-4): Behavioral Social Work and Behavioral Gerontology
      • Dr. Yealland’s Chamber of Horrors: Behavioral Medicine
        • Analysis in Terms of the Negative Reinforcement Contingency
      • Bruxism: Behavioral Medicine
      • Fear and Loathing in The School Shop: Behavioral Juvenile Corrections
      • The Four Basic Behavioral Contingencies
      • Lucille, the Restless Resident: Behavioral Clinical Psychology
      • Extinction Following Reinforcement
      • Lucille, The Restless Resident or The Psychiatric Nurse as a Behavioral: History Engineer
    • CHAPTER 3 Operant Conditioning for Dummies Part II
      • Getting A Little More Complex
        • So What The H— Is Behavior Analysis, Anyway?
        • How Quickly Should the Reinforcer Follow the Response? —The 60” Rule!
        • The Mystery of Delayed Reinforcers
      • Dr. Sidney J. Fields: Rule-Governed Behavior and University Teaching
        • Contingency Contracting Rule #1: Put it in writing.
        • Contingency Contracting Rule #2: Have effective behavioral consequences.
        • Contingency Contracting Rule #3: Performance not monitored once a PART turns to Jell-O.
        • Contingency Contracting Rule #4: Specify the contingencies clearly.
      • Self-Management: Using Applied Behavior Analysis to Get Your Act Together(G-20)
        • Your Very Own Research Project
      • Self-Management in The Classroom
      • Operant Conditioning (B-3)
      • The Law of Effect
      • Warning: Talkin’ to Mommy and Daddy
  • PART III: METHODOLOGY AND PHILOSOPHY
    • CHAPTER 4 Research Methods
      • Why Should We Do Behavior Analysis?
        • To Understand the World
        • To Build a Better World
      • Independent Variable and Dependent Variable (D-1): How Should We Evaluate Behavior Analysis
      • How to Stop Smoking
      • Multiple-Baseline Designs (D-5)
      • Interobserver Agreement (C-1, C-8)
      • Single-Subject vs. Group Experimental Design (D-4)
      • Experimental and Control Groups (D-3)
      • Social Validity
      • Internal Validity
      • Treatment Package (E-9)
      • Reversal Design (D-5)
      • Changing-Criterion Design (D-5) (G-19)
      • Alternating-Treatments Design (D-4) (D-5)
      • Control Condition
      • Generality of Results (D-2)
      • The Goals of Behavior Analysis as A Science (A-1)
        • Prediction (Correlation)
        • Control (Experimentation)
        • The Future Lies Ahead
        • Irony
    • CHAPTER 5 The Philosophy Supporting Behavior Analysis
      • Behaviorism (A-3, A-4)
      • The Philosophical Assumptions Underlying Behavior Analysis (A-2)
        • Attitudes of Science
      • Psychiatry vs. Psychology
      • Psychoanalysis vs. Behavior Analysis
      • Avoid Circular Reasoning
      • Circular Reasoning and The Error of Reification
      • The Medical Model Myth
      • Circular Reasoning and The Medical Model Myth
      • The Seven Dimensions of Applied Behavior Analysis (A-5)
  • PART IV: REINFORCEMENT
    • CHAPTER 6 Positive Reinforcement
      • Erics Tantrums—Part I: Behavioral Special Education
      • The Reinforcer (B-2)
      • Positive Reinforcer
      • Make Sure Your Assumed Reinforcer Really Reinforces (F-5): Reinforcer Assessment
      • Jimmy, The Child with Autism—Part I: Behavioral Special Education
      • Positive Reinforcement Contingency (B-4)
        • The Delay Gradient
      • Behavioral Contingency
      • The “Noncontingent” Delivery of Reinforcers: Behavioral Special Education
      • The “Noncontingent” Delivery of Reinforcers: Organizational Behavior Management
      • The Delivery of Reinforcers Before the Behavior
        • The Bribe
        • You Really Oughta Wanna
      • Bubblegum and Bowel Movements—Part I: Behavioral Child and Family Counseling
      • Poverty’s Children—Part I: Behavioral School Psychology
      • How to Talk About Behavior
        • Reinforce Behavior, Not People
      • Reinforcer vs. Reinforcement
      • A Few More Comments on Reinforcement
      • Biological Evolution and Reinforcers
    • CHAPTER 7 Negative Reinforcement
      • Negative Reinforcer (B-2)
        • “Aversive” vs. “Adversive”
      • Negative Reinforcement Contingency (Escape Contingency) (B-4) The Goil With the Doity Mouth: Behavioral Clinical
      • Undesirable Behavior Maintained by Reinforcement by The Removal of a Negative Reinforcer (G-1)
      • The Toothpaste Theory of Abnormal Behavior (A-2)
      • Reinforcement by The Presentation of a Positive Reinforcer vs. Reinforcement by The Removal of a Negative Reinforcer
      • Jimmy, The Child with Autism—Part II: Functional Assessment in Behavioral Special Education
      • Functional Assessment, Not Just A Quick Fix
      • Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder: Functional Assessment in School Psychology
      • Family Life—Part II: The Sick Social Cycle in Behavioral Family Counseling
        • Healthy Social Cycles
      • Escape from Electric Shock: Experimental Analysis of Behavior in The Skinner Box
      • Learning Without Awareness or Clueless at Columbia: The Case of The Twitching Thumb: Experimental Analysis of Behavior Out of The Skinner Box
      • Positive and Negative Reinforcers and Reinforcement
      • A Little More on Pronunciation
  • PART V: PUNISHMENT
    • CHAPTER 8 Positive Punishment
      • Positive Punishment Contingency (B-6)
      • Lemon Juice and Life-Threatening Regurgitation: Behavioral Medicine
      • Self-Injurious Behavior: Behavioral Medicine
        • Functional Analysis (F-6) (F-8)
      • Negative Reinforcement vs. Positive Punishment (Part I)
      • Undesirable Habitual Behavior: Behavioral Clinical Psychology
      • Contingent Exercise: People with Mental Disabilities
      • Overcorrection: People with Mental Disabilities
        • General Comments About Positive Punishment
      • Jimmy, The Child with Autism—Part III: The Sick Social Cycle in Behavioral Special Education
      • Jimmy, The Child with Autism—Part IV (B-7): Why Presumed Punishment Contingences Don’t Always Punish
      • Punishment of The Lever Press: Experimental Analysis of Behavior in The Skinner Box
      • Reinforcement of Punished Behavior
      • Basic Research: Experimental Analysis of Behavior in The Skinner Box
      • Confessions of An Aversive-Control Advocate
      • Should You Use Electric Shock in A Positive Punishment Contingency? Ethics
        • Confusion Between Punishment and Aggression
      • Negative Reinforcement vs. Positive Punishment (Part II)
      • The Myth of The Ineffectiveness of Punishment: The Controversy
    • CHAPTER 9 Negative Punishment
      • Using Negative Punishment to Decrease Self-Injuring: Developmental Disabilities
      • Negative Punishment (Penalty Contingency) (G-16)
      • It Ain’t Good to Say “Ain’t”: Behavioral Juvenile Corrections
      • Three’s A Crowd: Child and Family Counseling
      • Response Cost
      • The Joys of Motherhood: Behavioral Child and Family Counseling
      • Time-Out
      • The Time-Out Ribbon: Behavioral Special Education
      • Negative Punishment vs. The Three Other Basic Behavioral Contingencies
      • Helping A Baby with Colicky Behavior: Time-Out in Behavioral Medicine
      • Helping A Failure-To-Thrive Baby: Time-Out in Behavioral Medicine
      • Rolling Over the Dead man
      • Jimmy, The Child with Autism—Part V: Negative Punishment in Behavioral Special Education
      • The Big Four: Experimental Analysis of Behavior in The Skinner Box
      • For Every Negative Punishment Contingency, There’s A Reinforcement Contingency in The Background
      • The Benefits of Basic Research: And Ethics
      • Response Cost vs. Time-Out
      • Reversal Designs (D-5): Research Methods
      • The Importance of Baselines (E-3): Research Methods
  • PART VI: EXTINCTION AND RELATED PROCESSES
    • CHAPTER 10 Extinction and Recovery
      • Family Life—Part III: Crying: Child and Family Counseling
      • Don’t Try This at Home!
      • Extinction of Elopement (G-15): Developmental Disabilities
        • Functional Analysis (F-8)
      • Extinction Bursts and Spontaneous Recovery (H-5)
      • Eric’s Tantrums—Part II: Behavioral Special Education
      • Extinction Following Reinforcement vs. Negative Punishment (Response Cost and Time-Out)
      • Self-Stimulating Jimmy, The Child with Autism—Part VI: Behavioral Special Education
      • Aggression: Extinction of Escape in Behavioral Special Education
      • A Mentally Disabled Child’s Vomiting: Two Types of Extinction in Behavioral Medicine
      • Recovery from Punishment
      • Self-Stimulation and Destructive Behavior: Recovery from A Negative Punishment Contingency in Behavioral Clinical Psychology
      • Jimmy, The Child with Autism—Part VII: Behavioral Special Education
      • Extinction vs. Satiation: Experimental Analysis of Behavior in The Skinner Box
      • Extinction and Recovery: Experimental Analysis of Behavior in The Skinner Box
        • Extinction After Reinforcement
        • Extinction After Negative Reinforcement
        • Recovery from Punishment
      • Failure-To-Thrive Infants: A Complex Intervention Package in Behavioral Medicine
      • Extinction vs. Punishment: Ethics
      • The Moral Necessity to Evaluate Interventions (E-4): Ethics
      • The Reversal Design: Research Methods
      • Ethics (F-3): Richard’s Rant
      • Informed Consent and Social Validity: Ethics and Research Methods
      • No Informed Consent (E-2): Richard Keeps on Ranting
      • Recovery from Punishment vs. Spontaneous Recovery from Extinction
    • CHAPTER 11 Differential Reinforcement and Differential Punishment
      • Jimmy, The Child with Autism—Part VIII (G-14): Behavioral Special Education
      • Terrible Tennis: Behavioral Sports Psychology
      • Task Analysis
      • Response Dimensions (C-4) (C-5)
      • Parent Blaming: Differential Reinforcement of Incompatible Behavior and Infant Care
      • Differential Reinforcement: Experimental Analysis of Behavior in The Skinner Box
      • Response Class (B-1)
      • The Differential-Reinforcement Procedure
      • The Unintended Use of Differential Reinforcement by A Psychotherapist: Behavior Analysis of Clinical Psychology
      • Differential Negative Reinforcement: Everyday Life
      • Differential Reinforcement vs. Reinforcement
      • Differential Punishment: The Concept
      • Differential Punishment: Experimental Analysis of Behavior in The Skinner Box
      • Differential Reinforcement and Differential Punishment in Teaching Classical Ballet
      • Using Aversive Control to Shape Graceful Movements: Ethics
      • Jimmy, The Child with Autism—Part IX: Differential Negative Punishment in Behavioral Special Education
      • Frequency Graphs (G-21): Research Methods
      • Bill’s Face Slapping: Differential Reinforcement of Other Behavior (DRO)
      • Differential Reinforcement of Other Behavior: In the Skinner Box
      • Differential Reinforcement of Other Behavior (DRO) vs. Punishment by Prevention: A Controversy
  • PART VII: MOTIVATION
    • CHAPTER 12 Unconditioned and Conditioned Reinforcers and Punishers
      • Unconditioned Reinforcers and Punishers (B-8)
      • The Theory of Direct and Indirect Biological Relevance
        • Unconditioned Positive Reinforcers
        • Unconditioned Negative Reinforcers
        • Example of A Conditioned Reinforcer
      • Psychotic Talk: Behavioral Clinical Psychology
      • How Are Conditioned Reinforcers Conditioned? (B-8) (G-3)
      • Jimmy, The Child with Autism—Part X: Example of The Pairing Procedure and Conditioned Reinforcers in Behavioral Special Education
      • Socializing Jimmy
      • A Token Economy in A Psychiatric Ward (G-17): The Generalized Reinforcer in Behavioral Clinical Psychology
        • The Token Economy and Remedial Education: Behavioral School Psychology
        • The Morality of Remedial Education
      • Conditioned Punishers
      • How Do Conditioned Reinforcers and Punishers Lose Their Reinforcing and Punishing Value?
        • Extinction vs. The Unpairing of Conditioned Reinforcers and Conditioned Aversive Stimuli
      • Conditional Stimulus
      • Conditioned Reinforcers and Learning Language
      • Control Over Your Environment as A Conditioned Reinforcer
      • The Complexities of Creating Conditioned Reinforcers
        • No Descriptive Praise
        • How to Make Speech Sounds Conditioned Reinforcers
        • Social Reinforcers
      • Conditioned Reinforcers: Experimental Analysis in The Skinner Box
        • Conditioned Reinforcers and Deprivation
        • Some Confusions
      • Psychotic Talk—The Seeds of The Behavioral Revolution
      • Proof of A Conditioned Reinforcer in The Skinner Box: Research Methods
      • Determining the Effectiveness of Tokens as Reinforcers: Research Methods
        • Ruling Out the Environmental Enrichment View
        • Summary: Noncontingent Reinforcers as A Control Procedure—Part I
        • Ruling Out Chance
        • The Flesh Is Willing, But It Needs A Few Reinforcers
        • Noncontingent Reinforcers as A Control Procedure—Part II
    • CHAPTER 13 Motivating Operations
      • Jimmy, The Child with Autism—Part XI: Deprivation and Satiation
      • Satiation: Experimental Analysis of Behavior in The Skinner Box
      • Jimmy, The Child with Autism—Part XII: Example of Satiation in Behavioral Special Education Habituation
      • Sex: Example of Satiation in Comparative Psychology
      • Satiation, Deprivation, And the Effectiveness of Reinforcement Contingencies: More Comparative Psychology
      • Motivating Operations (B-12)
        • The Main-Stream Approach to Motivating Operations
        • The Reflexive Motivating Operation
        • Satiation, Deprivation, And the Effectiveness of Negative Punishment Contingencies
      • The Quantity and Quality of Positive and Negative Reinforcers
      • The Don’t Say Rule: A Reminder
      • Aggression (B-12)
        • Pain-Motivated Aggression
        • Extinction-Motivated Aggression
        • What Are the Stimuli Resulting from Acts of Aggression?
        • If This Physical Stimulation Is So Reinforcing, Why Don’t We Aggress All the Time?
        • What About Verbal Aggression; What Are the Aggression Reinforcers There?
        • Is Letting Off Steam or Letting Out the Energy Generated by Frustration (Extinction) An Aggression Reinforcer?
      • Subtle Aggression
      • Aggression Reinforcers
        • A Behavior-Analytic Theory of Aggression
        • Is Aggression Behavior Learned?
        • What’s the Value of Aggression?
        • Why Isn’t Success in Battle Enough of a Reinforcer?
      • Drug Addiction
        • Negative Reinforcement—Pain
        • Negative Reinforcement—Withdrawal
        • The Pure Pleasure of Drugs
      • Addictive Reinforcers
  • PART VII: STIMULUS CONTROL
    • CHAPTER 14 Basic Stimulus Control
      • Behavioral Animal Training
      • Discrimination Training Based on Positive Reinforcement (G-2) (G-10):
      • Discrimination Training Based on Negative Reinforcement (Escape)
      • Multiple SDs and S?s: Teaching A Juvenile Delinquent to Read: Behavioral School Psychology
      • Discrimination Training Based on Positive Punishment
      • Reinforcement-Based Discriminative Stimuli vs. Punishment-Based Discriminative Stimuli
      • The Differential-Reinforcement Procedure vs. The Stimulus-Discrimination Procedure: In the Skinner Box
        • The Nondiscriminated, Nondifferential Reinforcement Procedure
        • The Differential-Reinforcement Procedure
        • Stimulus-Discrimination Procedure
        • Differential-Punishment and Stimulus-Discrimination Procedures Using Punishment
      • Multiple SDs And S?s: Poverty’s Children Part II: Educational Psychology
      • Transfer of Training
      • Verbal Behavior (A.K.A. Language) (B-14)
      • Prompts (G-4)
      • Jimmy, The Child with Autism—Part XIII
      • Preparing Jimmy to Be A Student: Behavioral Special Education
      • HeroRATs
      • The Discriminating Pigeon: In the Skinner Box
      • Requirements for Effective Discrimination Training
        • Pre-Attending Skills
        • Sensory Capability
        • Conspicuous Stimulus
        • Discrimination-Training Procedure
      • Discriminative Stimulus (SD) vs. Before Condition
      • Discriminative Stimulus (SD) vs. Operandum
      • Discriminative Stimulus (SD) vs. Nondiscriminated Reinforcement Contingency
        • The Skinner Box: Nondiscriminated Reinforcement Contingencies
        • Applied Behavior Analysis: Nondiscriminated Punishment Contingencies
    • CHAPTER 15 Complex Stimulus Control
      • The Pecking Pigeon People Peeper: The Experimental Analysis of Concept Training
      • Stimulus Class, Stimulus Generalization, And Concept Training (B-2) (B-11)
        • The Experimental Analysis of Concept Training
      • Art Appreciation 101 For Pigeons
      • Conceptual Control and Other Concepts
      • Discrimination vs. Generalization
      • Stimulus Dimensions and Fading
      • Example of Errorless Discrimination
        • Teaching “Reading” (G-4): Jimmy, The Child with Autism—Part XIV: Behavioral School Psychology
      • Keep It Simple
      • Dumbass Award #2 (G-10)
      • Teaching for Complexity and Generalization
      • Stimulus-Generalization Gradients: Experimental Analysis in The Skinner Box
        • Training with Intermittent Reinforcement
        • Testing in Extinction
      • Amount of Generalization vs. Amount of Discrimination
      • Science and Objectivity
      • The Beginnings of Heavy-Duty Intellectuality
      • Matching to Sample
        • The Pigeon
        • Behavioral School Psychology
        • Jimmy, The Child with Autism—Part XV
        • The Regular-Education Preschooler
        • The College Student
        • The Pigeon (Advanced Course)
      • Grammar Checks & Conditional Discriminations
      • Everyday Life: A Concept Control Problem
  • PART IX: COMPLEX PROCESSES I
    • CHAPTER 16 Imitation
      • Teaching Imitation to A Child with An Intellectual Disability (G-4) (G-5): Imitation in Behavioral Special Education
      • Added vs. Built-In Contingencies for Imitation
      • Using Excessive Imitation to Establish Normal Language Skills
        • Describing Simple Past Events
        • Describing Complex Past Events
      • The Importance of Imitation
      • The Invasion of The Advertisers from Outer Space
      • How Do You Know If It’s Really Imitation?
      • Generalized Imitation: Theory
        • How To Establish Conditioned Reinforcers
        • How to Establish Conditioned Imitative Reinforcers
      • Imitation as A Prerequisite to Learning Language: Verbal Behavior (Language)
      • Generalized Imitation of Inappropriate Behavior: Research Methods
      • An Adequate Control Condition to Show Reinforcement
    • CHAPTER 17 Avoidance
      • Sidney Slouch Stands Straight: Behavioral Medicine
      • Avoidance Contingency
      • Avoidance of A Negative Reinforcer (A Mildly Aversive Overcorrection): Developmental Disabilities
      • Jimmy, The Child with Autism—Part XVI
      • Eye Contact
      • Avoidance-of-Loss Contingency
      • Avoidance of Reprimands: Behavioral School Psychology
      • Negative Reinforcement vs. Avoidance
      • Cross-Cultural Conflict
      • Avoidance of A Negative Reinforcer: In the Skinner Box
        • Cued Avoidance
        • Continuous-Response Avoidance
        • Non-Cued Avoidance
        • Avoidance of The Loss of a Reinforcer
      • Avoidance in Your Everyday Life
      • Avoidance of A Negative Reinforcer vs. Punishment by The Presentation of a Negative Reinforcer
        • The Amazing Adventures of Behaviorman (Behaviorwoman)
        • Differential Punishment vs. Differential Avoidance
      • Avoidance of Loss of a Reinforcer vs. Punishment by Removal of a Reinforcer
      • Warning Stimulus vs. Discriminative Stimulus
      • Research Methods
      • Using Pilot Studies to Help You Get Your Act Together Before You Take It on The Road:
      • Cued Avoidance and Conditional Negative Reinforcers
      • Jimmy’s Eyes
      • Sidney’s Slouch
      • Industrial/Organizational Behavior Management
        • Behavior-Based Safety in Hillary’s Hypothetical Helicopter Hanger
      • Don’t Blame the Victim
      • Teleology
  • PART X: COMPLEX PROCESSES II
    • CHAPTER 18 Shaping
      • Helping A Mental Hospital Resident Speak Again: Behavioral Clinical Psychology
      • Shaping with Reinforcement (G-7)
      • Helping A Child with Autism Wear Glasses: Behavioral Medicine
      • Differential-Reinforcement vs. Shaping with Reinforcement
      • Raising the Voice Intensity of An Aphonic Child: Behavioral Speech Pathology
      • Shaping with Punishment: Everyday Life
      • Learning to Walk and Run: Variable-Outcome Shaping: Everyday Life
      • Fixed-Outcome Shaping vs. Variable-Outcome Shaping
      • Loosening Up A Bit: Notes from The Skinner Box
      • Shaping with Reinforcement: Experimental Analysis of Behavior in The Skinner Box
      • Response Shaping, Stimulus Fading, And Reinforcer Reduction
      • Shaping with Punishment: Experimental Analysis in The Skinner Box
      • Shaping vs. Getting in Shape
      • Shaping vs. Behavioral Chaining (G-8): In the Skinner Box
    • CHAPTER 19 Behavioral Chains
      • Nancy, A Child with Cerebral Palsy: Behavioral Medicine
      • Behavioral Chains (G-8)
      • Dual-Functioning Chained Stimuli
      • Forward Chaining
      • Total-Task Presentation
      • Backward Chaining
      • Getting Dressed: Backward Chaining
      • Jimmy, The Child with Autism—Part XVII: Backward Chaining
        • Eating with A Spoon
      • Backward Chaining: In the Skinner Box
      • Dual-Functioning Chained Stimuli: In the Skinner Box
      • Non-Chained Behavior Sequences
  • PART XI: SCHEDULES OF REINFORCEMENT
    • CHAPTER 20 Ratio Schedules
      • The Divers of Nassau
      • Schedules of Reinforcement
      • Fixed-Ratio Schedules of Reinforcement: Experimental Analysis of Behavior
      • The Cumulative Graph (C-10): Experimental Analysis of Behavior
      • Variable-Ratio Schedules of Reinforcement
      • The Independent vs. Dependent Variables In Schedules of Reinforcement
      • Ratio Schedules of Negative Reinforcement and Negative Punishment
      • A Review: Reinforcer vs. Reinforcement
      • Ratio Schedules of Reinforcement and Punishment in Everyday Life
      • Discrete-Trial Procedures vs. Free-Operant Procedures (G-9)
    • CHAPTER 21 Time-Based Schedules
      • Fixed-Interval Schedules of Reinforcement (C-10): Experimental Analysis of Behavior
      • Are There Any Everyday Examples of Fixed-Interval Schedules?
      • Joe’s Term Paper?
      • The Pigeon vs. The United States Congress
      • Other Non-examples Of Fixed Interval Schedules of Reinforcement
        • The Tv Schedule
        • The Paycheck Schedule
        • A Correct Example of a Fixed-Interval Schedule of Reinforcement
      • Superstition in The Pigeon
      • Fixed-Time Schedules and Superstitious Behavior: Experimental Analysis of Behavior
      • Interval Schedules vs. Time Schedules of Reinforcement (B-5)
      • Variable-Interval Schedules of Reinforcement
      • Extinction and Schedules of Reinforcement
      • Ratio and Interval Schedules of Reinforcement
        • When Does the Reinforcer Occur?
        • What’s the Relation Between Rate of Responding and Rate of Reinforcement?
      • Cumulative Records of the Four Basic Schedules of Reinforcement
      • Intermittent Reinforcement And Resistance to Extinction
      • Resistance to Extinction vs. Response Strength
  • PART XII: COMPLEX PROCESSES III
    • CHAPTER 22 Concurrent Contingences
      • Play vs. Self-Stimulation with Jimmy, The Child with Autism—Part XVIII: Behavioral Clinical Psychology
      • Concurrent Contingencies
      • Concurrent Contingencies and The Factors That Interfere with Language Learning: Verbal Behavior and Autism
        • Disruptive Behavior as An Alternative to Verbal Behavior
        • Nondisruptive Behavior as An Alternative to Verbal Behavior
        • Suppression of Verbal Behavior by Punishment
      • Two More Factors That Interfere with Language Learning
        • No One Is Around to Reinforce Verbal Behavior
        • When Parents Don’t Require Any Verbal Behavior
      • Biological Problems That Interfere with Language Learning
      • Dining Out with Children—A Dangerous Activity, At Best, Or the Invasion of The Ankle-Biters
      • Shopping with Children—A Dangerous Activity, At Best: Behavioral Child and Family Counseling
      • Earl, The Hyperactive Boy: Concurrent Contingencies in Behavioral School Psychology
      • Differential Reinforcement of Incompatible Behavior (D-21)
      • Differential Reinforcement of Incompatible Behavior vs. Differential Reinforcement of Alternative Behavior
        • Inappropriate Natural Contingency
        • Performance-Management Contingency
      • Symptom Substitution
      • Concurrent Contingencies: Asleep at The Keyboard
      • Intervention (Treatment) Package (B-10): Research Methods
        • Behavioral Science
        • Providing Behavioral Service
      • Technology Development
      • Concurrent Contingencies and The Matching Law: Experimental Analysis of Behavior in the Skinner Box
    • CHAPTER 23 Maintenance and Transfer
      • The Legend of Big Bob’s Bovine: False Parable
      • The Myth of Perpetual Behavior and The Myth of Intermittent Reinforcement: Controversy
      • Jungle Jim, The Social Climber: Behavioral School Psychology
      • Setting A Behavior Trap to Maintain Performance (G-22)
      • Behavior Traps, Extended Programs, And Dicky At 13: Behavioral Medicine
      • Reclaiming A Small Girl from An Institution for The Developmentally Disabled:
      • Behavioral Medicine
      • Use Intermittent Contingencies to Maintain Performance
      • Maintain the Contingencies and You’ll Maintain Performance
        • Perpetual-Contingency Contracting
      • The Main Point
      • What to Do After the Performance Manager Goes Home or After the Doctoral Student Finishes the Dissertation
      • Transfer of Training
      • Reduce Stimulus Control and Increase Transfer (G-21)
      • Streetwise: Developmental Disabilities
      • Stimulus Generalization and Response Induction Is Not Enough
      • Could Rule-Governed Behavior Support Transfer of Training?
      • Rule-Governed Behavior in The Classroom
        • Training Jimmy to Self-Instruct
        • Training for Transfer of Training
        • Training for Covert Self-Instruction
      • Overall Summary of Maintenance and Transfer (G-22)
        • Transfer with Verbal Clients
        • Maintenance with Verbal Clients
      • I’m Right and Everyone Else Is Wrong: A Very Advanced Enrichment Section
  • PART XIII: VERBAL BEHAVIOR
    • CHAPTER 24 Verbal Behavior
      • Introduction (G-11)
      • Shreeya And the Primary Verbal Operants (B-14)
        • Vocal Behavior (Vocalization)
        • Echoic (Vocal Imitation)
        • Mand (Request)
        • Listener Behavior (Receptive Identification)
        • Listener Behavior (Following Instructions)
        • Tact (Expressive Identification, Labeling)
        • Textual (Reading)
        • Textual (Reading) Comprehension
        • Transcription (Writing)
      • Shreeya And the Complex Verbal Operants
        • Generative Verbal Behavior
        • The Autoclitic
        • Intraverbal
      • Intermediate Enrichment
        • The Essence of Naming
        • Follow Up with Shreeya
      • Advanced Enrichment: Stimulus Equivalence—Putting the Names with The Faces (G-12)
        • Symbolic Matching-to-Sample
        • Symmetry
        • Transitivity
        • Reflexivity
        • Practical Implications
        • Stimulus Equivalence
        • Derived Stimulus Relations
  • PART XIV: RULE-GOVERNED BEHAVIOR
    • CHAPTER 25 Rule-Governed Behavior: Concepts and Applications
      • Bubblegum and Bowel Movements—Part II (B-13): Behavioral Medicine
      • When Reinforcement Won’t Work: The Problem of Reinforcement vs. The Delayed Delivery of a Reinforcer
      • The Deadline
      • Some Important Distinctions
      • The Rule-Governed Analog to Direct-Acting Behavioral Contingencies
      • Applied Behavior Analysis with Verbal and Nonverbal Clients
      • Rules, Instructions, Requests, And Incomplete Rules
      • Rules Describing Direct-Acting Contingencies
      • Hard Sell for The Skeptical
      • The Importance of Deadlines
        • Why Do Deadlines Control Our Behavior?
        • Why Do We Procrastinate?
      • Indirect-Acting Avoidance Analogue
      • The Offensive Backfield on A Pop Warner Football Team: Feedback vs. Praise: Rule-Governed Behavior: Application in Behavioral Sports Psychology
    • CHAPTER 26 Rule-Governed Behavior: Theory
      • How Do Rules Govern Our Behavior?
      • Rule Statements as Verbal (Analog) Pairing Procedures
      • The Mythical Cause of Poor Self-Management
      • The Small, But Cumulative, Outcomes
      • The Improbable Outcome
      • The Truth About the Causes of Poor Self-Management
      • What’s Wrong with Small but Cumulatively Significant and Improbable Outcomes?
      • Why Do We Miss Deadlines?
      • The Secret of Contingency Contracting
      • Verbal Clients and The Ineffective Natural Contingency
      • Verbal Clients and Effective Indirect-Acting Performance-Management Contingencies
        • Deadlines
        • Verbal Clients and Low Probability Outcomes
      • An Analysis of Procrastination
      • The Contingency Contract: An Analysis in University Teaching
      • An Interaction Between the Probability and The Significance of The Outcome
      • Can We Build A World Free of Aversive Control?
        • Why Can’t We Build A World Free of Aversive Control?
        • Why Can’t We Live in A World Based Solely on Reinforcers, With No Aversiveness?
        • But Why Can’t We Prepare for Class Simply as A Result of Reinforcement by The Presentation of Reinforcers?
        • Ok, But Why Can’t We Use Large Enough Learned Generalized Reinforcers to Reinforce Our Preparing for Class Without Such Heavy Deprivation?
        • Then Why Not Build the Reinforcers into the Task?
        • Conclusion
        • Addendum
  • Thanks
  • Appendix: BCBA/BCaBA Task List (5th ed.)
  • Glossary
  • Index

UM RAFBÆKUR Á HEIMKAUP.IS

Bókahillan þín er þitt svæði og þar eru bækurnar þínar geymdar. Þú kemst í bókahilluna þína hvar og hvenær sem er í tölvu eða snjalltæki. Einfalt og þægilegt!

Rafbók til eignar
Rafbók til eignar þarf að hlaða niður á þau tæki sem þú vilt nota innan eins árs frá því bókin er keypt.

Þú kemst í bækurnar hvar sem er
Þú getur nálgast allar raf(skóla)bækurnar þínar á einu augabragði, hvar og hvenær sem er í bókahillunni þinni. Engin taska, enginn kyndill og ekkert vesen (hvað þá yfirvigt).

Auðvelt að fletta og leita
Þú getur flakkað milli síðna og kafla eins og þér hentar best og farið beint í ákveðna kafla úr efnisyfirlitinu. Í leitinni finnur þú orð, kafla eða síður í einum smelli.

Glósur og yfirstrikanir
Þú getur auðkennt textabrot með mismunandi litum og skrifað glósur að vild í rafbókina. Þú getur jafnvel séð glósur og yfirstrikanir hjá bekkjarsystkinum og kennara ef þeir leyfa það. Allt á einum stað.

Hvað viltu sjá? / Þú ræður hvernig síðan lítur út
Þú lagar síðuna að þínum þörfum. Stækkaðu eða minnkaðu myndir og texta með multi-level zoom til að sjá síðuna eins og þér hentar best í þínu námi.



Fleiri góðir kostir
- Þú getur prentað síður úr bókinni (innan þeirra marka sem útgefandinn setur)
- Möguleiki á tengingu við annað stafrænt og gagnvirkt efni, svo sem myndbönd eða spurningar úr efninu
- Auðvelt að afrita og líma efni/texta fyrir t.d. heimaverkefni eða ritgerðir
- Styður tækni sem hjálpar nemendum með sjón- eða heyrnarskerðingu
Eiginleikar
Vörumerki: Taylor and Francis
Vörunúmer: 9781000367003
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