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Construction Contracting: A Practical Guide to Company Management

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Efnisyfirlit

  • Title Page
  • Copyright
  • Contents
  • Chapter 1 The Construction Industry
    • 1.1 Introduction
    • 1.2 The Construction Project
    • 1.3 Economic Importance
    • 1.4 The People involved on a Construction Project
      • 1.4.1 Owner
      • 1.4.2 The Architect-Engineer
      • 1.4.3 Engineering Consultants
      • 1.4.4 Other Consultants
      • 1.4.5 Construction Manager
      • 1.4.6 The Prime Contractor
      • 1.4.7 The Subcontractor
      • 1.4.8 The Sub-subcontractor
      • 1.4.9 Vendors
    • 1.5 Construction Categories
      • 1.5.1 Residential Construction
      • 1.5.2 Commercial Construction
      • 1.5.3 Heavy/Civil/Highway Construction
      • 1.5.4 Industrial Construction
    • 1.6 Project Financing
      • 1.6.1 By Owner
      • 1.6.2 By Builder-Vendor
      • 1.6.3 By Developer
    • 1.7 The Contract System
    • 1.8 Project Delivery Methods
      • 1.8.1 Construction Services Only
      • 1.8.2 Design-Bid-Build
      • 1.8.3 The Team Approach
      • 1.8.4 Design-Build
      • 1.8.5 Design-Manage
      • 1.8.6 Preengineered Buildings
      • 1.8.7 Fast-Track
      • 1.8.8 General Conditions Construction
      • 1.8.9 Value Engineering
    • 1.9 Types of Construction Contracts
      • 1.9.1 Single-Contract System
      • 1.9.2 Separate-Contracts System
    • 1.10 Forms of Construction Contract Award
      • 1.10.1 Competitive Bid Contracting
      • 1.10.2 Competitive Negotiation
      • 1.10.3 Negotiated Contracting
    • 1.11 Forms of Negotiated Contracts
      • 1.11.1 Lump-Sum
      • 1.11.2 Unit Price
      • 1.11.3 Cost-Plus or Cost-Reimbursable
    • 1.12 Basic Elements of Agreement in the Various Types of Cost-Plus Contracts
      • 1.12.1 Cost Plus a Fixed Fee
      • 1.12.2 Cost Plus a Percentage of CostThe owner will reimburse the contractor’s costs
      • 1.12.3 Cost Plus a Fixed Fee or Percentage of Cost, with a Guaranteed Maximum
      • 1.12.4 Cost Plus a Fixed Fee or Percentage of Cost, with a Guaranteed Maximum and a Savings or Incen
    • 1.13 Competitive Sealed Proposals
    • 1.14 Other Forms of Contracts
      • 1.14.1 Time and Materials Contracts
      • 1.14.2 Job Order Contracting
      • 1.14.3 Construction by Force Account
    • 1.15 Small and Disadvantaged Business Enterprises
    • 1.16 Seasonality in Construction
    • 1.17 Licensing
    • 1.18 License Bonds
    • 1.19 Building Codes
    • 1.20 Contractor Organizations
    • 1.21 Management Practices in Construction
    • 1.22 Business Failures in Construction
    • 1.23 Summary and Conclusions
    • Chapter 1 Review Questions
  • Chapter 2 Business Ownership
    • 2.1 Introduction
    • 2.2 Alternative Forms
    • 2.3 Construction Contracting Firms
    • 2.4 The Individual Proprietorship
    • 2.5 The General Partnership
    • 2.6 Establishing a Partnership
    • 2.7 Liability of a General Partner
    • 2.8 Dissolution of a Partnership
    • 2.9 Subpartnership
    • 2.10 The Limited Partnership
    • 2.11 The Corporation
    • 2.12 The Foreign Corporation
    • 2.13 Stockholders
    • 2.14 Corporate Directors and Officers
    • 2.15 The S Corporation
    • 2.16 Employee Stock Ownership Plan (ESOP)
    • 2.17 Limited Liability Company (LLC)
    • 2.18 The Joint Venture
    • 2.19 Summary and Conclusions
    • Chapter 2 Review Questions
  • Chapter 3 Company Organization
    • 3.1 Introduction
    • 3.2 Organization Basics
    • 3.3 General Considerations
    • 3.4 Principles of Organization
      • 3.4.1 List of Duties
      • 3.4.2 Division of Duties
      • 3.4.3 Organizational Structure and Organization Chart
      • 3.4.4 Staffing
      • 3.4.5 Communications
      • 3.4.6 The Manual of Policies and Procedures
      • 3.4.7 The Employee Handbook
      • 3.4.8 Plan Implementation and Adjustment
    • 3.5 Responsibility, Authority, and Delegation
    • 3.6 Making the Organization Work
      • 3.6.1 Decision Making
      • 3.6.2 Personnel Development
      • 3.6.3 Training of Replacements
      • 3.6.4 Motivation
    • 3.7 Summary and Conclusions
    • Chapter 3 Review Questions
  • Chapter 4 Project Design and Contract and Bid Documents for a Project
    • 4.1 Introduction
    • 4.2 The Architect-Engineer
      • 4.2.1 Owner-Client
      • 4.2.2 In-House Capability
      • 4.2.3 Design-Build
      • 4.2.4 Construction Management
      • 4.2.5 Design-Manage
    • 4.3 Designers’ Professional Associations
    • 4.4 Selection of the Architect-Engineer
    • 4.5 Services Provided by the Architect-Engineer
    • 4.6 Fee for Design Services
    • 4.7 Responsibility to the Owner
    • 4.8 Liability to Third Persons
    • 4.9 Statutes of Limitations
    • 4.10 Contractor Input Into Design
    • 4.11 Project Description—Communicating the Design
    • 4.12 Announcing the Project to Contractors
      • 4.12.1 Advertisement for Bids
      • 4.12.2 Invitation to Bid
    • 4.13 Project Manual
    • 4.14 BID Documents
    • 4.15 Instructions to Bidders
    • 4.16 Contract Documents
      • 4.16.1 Conditions of the Contract
      • 4.16.2 Drawings
      • 4.16.3 Specifications
      • 4.16.4 Addenda
      • 4.16.5 Alternates
      • 4.16.6 Contractor-Designated Alternates
      • 4.16.7 Agreement
      • 4.16.8 Modifications to the Contract
    • 4.17 Summary and Conclusions
    • Chapter 4 Review Questions
  • Chapter 5 Cost Estimating and Bidding
    • 5.1 Introduction
    • 5.2 General
    • 5.3 Types of Estimates
    • 5.3 Types of Estimates
      • 5.3.1 Approximate Estimates
      • 5.3.2 Detailed Estim
      • 5.3.3 Lump-Sum Estimates
      • 5.3.4 Unit-Price Estimates
    • 5.4 Preliminary Considerations Prior to Commencing the Estimate
      • 5.4.1 Reporting Services
      • 5.4.2 Availability of Drawings and Specifications
    • 5.5 Set-Asides
    • 5.6 Qualification
    • 5.7 The Decision to BID
    • 5.8 The Bidding Period
    • 5.9 Prebid Meetings
    • 5.10 Work to be Self-Performed Andwork to be Subcontracted
    • 5.11 Site Visit
    • 5.12 Project Time Schedule
    • 5.13 Preparing the Estimate
      • 5.13.1 Estimating Materials Costs
    • 5.14 Estimating Labor Cost
      • 5.14.1 Direct Labor
      • 5.14.2 Indirect Labor
      • 5.14.3 Other Considerations in Estimating Labor
    • 5.15 Estimating Equipment Cost
      • 5.15.1 Equipment Expense
      • 5.15.2 Ownership and Operating Costs
      • 5.15.3 Equipment Production Rates
    • 5.16 Indirect Costs
      • 5.16.1 Project Overhead
      • 5.16.2 General Overhead
    • 5.17 Subcontractor Proposals
      • 5.17.1 Additional Considerations Regarding Subcontractor Proposals
      • 5.17.2 Assigned Subcontracts
    • 5.18 Markup
    • 5.19 The Lump-Sum Recap Sheet
    • 5.20 The Unit-Price Recap Sheet
    • 5.21 Bid Changes
    • 5.22 Finalizing the Estimate
    • 5.23 The Proposal
    • 5.24 Bidding Procedures
    • 5.25 Submission of Proposals
    • 5.26 Responsive BID and Technicalities
    • 5.27 BID Spread
    • 5.28 Out of the Money
    • 5.29 The Acceptance Period
    • 5.30 Rejection of Proposals
    • 5.31 Withdrawal of BID by Prime Contractor
    • 5.32 Withdrawal of BID by Subcontractor
    • 5.33 List of Subcontractors
    • 5.34 Contingencies Allowances and Subcontract Allowances
    • 5.35 Disclaimers and Waivers
    • 5.36 BID Ethics
    • 5.37 BID Depositories
    • 5.38 BID Rigging
    • 5.39 Unbalanced Bids
    • 5.40 Complimentary Bids
    • 5.41 State Preference Statutes
    • 5.42 Scheduling BID Dates
    • 5.43 Scope Bidding
    • 5.44 Range Estimating
    • 5.45 Introducing Probabilistic Determinations Into the Estimate
    • 5.46 Computer-Based Estimating
    • 5.47 Summary and Conclusions
    • Chapter 5 Review Questions
  • Chapter 6 Construction Contract Provisions
    • 6.1 Introduction—Construction Contracts
    • 6.2 Contract Clauses
    • 6.3 Rights and Responsibilities of the Owner
    • 6.4 Duties and Authorities of the Architect-Engineer
    • 6.5 Indemnification
    • 6.6 Rights and Responsibilities of the Contractor
    • 6.7 Subcontracts
    • 6.8 Subcontract Provisions
    • 6.9 Contract Time
    • 6.10 Liquidated Damages
    • 6.11 Extensions of Time
    • 6.12 Acceleration
    • 6.13 Differing Site Conditions
    • 6.14 Owner-Caused Delay
    • 6.15 The Agreement
    • 6.16 Letter of Intent
    • 6.17 The Notice to Proceed
    • 6.18 Acceptance and Final Payment
    • 6.19 Termination of the Contract
    • 6.20 The Warranty Period
    • 6.21 Summary and Conclusions
    • Chapter 6 Review Questions
  • Chapter 7 Contract Surety Bonds
    • 7.1 Introduction
    • 7.2 Basic Elements of Understanding
    • 7.3 Forms of Contract Bonds
    • 7.4 BID Bonds
    • 7.5 Performance Bonds
    • 7.6 Payment Bonds
    • 7.7 Statutory and Common-Law Bonds
    • 7.8 The Miller Act
    • 7.9 Claims for Payment
    • 7.10 Contract Changes
    • 7.11 Bond Premiums
    • 7.12 The Surety
    • 7.13 Indemnity of Surety
    • 7.14 Investigation by Surety
    • 7.15 Rationale for Requiring Construction Bonds
    • 7.16 Bonding Capacity of Contractors
    • 7.17 The Surety Agent
    • 7.18 Default by the Contractor
    • 7.19 Contract Bonds and Type of Contract
    • 7.20 Subcontract Bonds
    • 7.21 Contract Bond Alternatives
    • 7.22 Additional Surety Bonds
      • 7.22.1 Maintenance Bonds
      • 7.22.2 Fidelity Bond
      • 7.22.3 Bonds to Release Retainage
      • 7.22.4 Bonds to Discharge Liens or Claims
      • 7.22.5 Bonds to Indemnify Owner Against Liens
      • 7.22.6 Bonds to Protect Owners of Rented Equipment and Leased Property
      • 7.22.7 Judicial or Court Bonds
      • 7.22.8 License Bond
      • 7.22.9 Termite Bond
      • 7.22.10 Subdivision Bond
      • 7.22.11 Self-Insurers’Workers’ Compensation Bond
      • 7.22.12 UnionWage Bond
    • 7.23 Summary and Conclusions
    • Chapter 7 Review Questions
  • Chapter 8 Construction Insurance
    • 8.1 Introduction
    • 8.2 Risk Management
    • 8.3 Construction Risks
    • 8.4 The Insurance Policy
    • 8.5 Contract Requirements
    • 8.6 Legal Requirements
    • 8.7 Analysis of Insurable Risks
    • 8.8 Construction Insurance Checklist
    • 8.9 Project Property Insurance
    • 8.10 Builder’s Risk Insurance
    • 8.11 All-Risk Builder’s Risk Insurance
    • 8.12 Named-Peril Builder’s Risk Insurance
    • 8.13 Builder’s Risk Policy Premiums
    • 8.14 Provision of Builder’s Risk Insurance by the Owner
    • 8.15 Subrogation
    • 8.16 Termination of Builder’s Risk Insurance
    • 8.17 Contractor’s Equipment Floater Policy
    • 8.18 Property Insurance
    • 8.19 Crime Insurance
    • 8.20 Liability Insurance
    • 8.21 Commercial General Liability Insurance
    • 8.22 Bodily Injury and Property Damage Liability Insurance
    • 8.23 Contractor’s Protective Public and Property Damage Liability Insurance
    • 8.24 Completed-Operations Liability Insurance
    • 8.25 Contractual Liability Insurance
    • 8.26 Third-Party Beneficiary Clauses
    • 8.27 Personal Injury
    • 8.28 Exclusions From Commercial General Liability Policy
    • 8.29 Property Damage Liability Exclusions
    • 8.30 Automobile Insurance
    • 8.31 Professional Liability Insurance
    • 8.32 Umbrella Excess Liability Insurance
    • 8.33 Wrap-Up Insurance
    • 8.34 Owner’s Liability Insurance
    • 8.35 Subcontractors’ Insurance
    • 8.36 Group Insurance Plans
    • 8.37 Employee Benefit Insurance
    • 8.38 Certificates of Insurance
    • 8.39 The Principles of Workers’ Compensation
    • 8.40 Workers’ Compensation Laws
    • 8.41 Administration of Workers’ Compensation Laws
    • 8.42 Workers’ Compensation Benefits
    • 8.43 Additional Provisions Ofworkers’ Compensation Laws
    • 8.44 Workers’ Compensation Insurance
    • 8.45 Workers’ Compensation Insurance Rates
    • 8.46 Workers’ Compensation Deductible Plan
    • 8.47 Workers’ Compensation Self-Insurance
    • 8.48 Employer’s Liability Insurance
    • 8.49 Nonoccupational Disability Insurance
    • 8.50 Unemployment Insurance
    • 8.51 Insurance Claims
    • 8.52 Social Security
    • 8.53 Summary and Conclusions
    • Chapter 8 Review Questions
  • Chapter 9 Business Methods
    • 9.1 Introduction
    • 9.2 Financial Records
    • 9.3 Accounting Methods
    • 9.4 Accounting for Long-Term Contracts
    • 9.5 Percentage-of-Completion Method
    • 9.6 Percentage-of-Completion Capitalized Cost Method
    • 9.7 Completed-Contract Method
    • 9.8 Financial Statements
    • 9.9 The Income Statement
    • 9.10 The Balance Sheet
    • 9.11 Financial Ratios
    • 9.12 Significance of Ratios
    • 9.13 Construction Equipment Acquisition
    • 9.14 Equipment Management
    • 9.15 Equipment Depreciation
    • 9.16 Straight-Line Depreciation
    • 9.17 Accelerated Depreciation
    • 9.18 Modified Accelerated Cost Recovery System (Macrs)
    • 9.19 Procurement
      • 9.19.1 Purchasing
      • 9.19.2 Expediting and Receiving
      • 9.19.3 Inspection
      • 9.19.4 Shipping
      • 9.19.5 Subcontracts
    • 9.20 Discounts by Vendors and Suppliers
    • 9.21 Title of Purchases
      • 9.21.1 Cash Sale
      • 9.21.2 On-Approval Sale
      • 9.21.3 Sale or Return
      • 9.21.4 Delivery by Vendor
      • 9.21.5 Shipment by Common Carrier
      • 9.22 A Contractor’s Right to Check on Project Financing
      • 9.23 Payment to the General Contractor
      • 9.24 Payment Requests for Lump-Sum Contracts
      • 9.26 Payment Requests for Cost-Plus Contracts
      • 9.27 Final Payment
      • 9.28 Payments to Subcontractors
      • 9.29 Direct Payment
      • 9.30 Backcharges
      • 9.31 Payments to Material Suppliers
      • 9.32 Cash Flow
      • 9.33 Cash Forecasts
      • 9.34 The Mechanic’s Lien
      • 9.35 Release of Lien
      • 9.36 Assignment of Contracts
      • 9.37 Marketing
        • 9.37.1 Web Site
        • 9.37.2 Social Media Sites, Especially LinkedIn
        • 9.37.3 Project Signs
        • 9.37.4 Company Brochure
        • 9.37.5 Advertising
        • 9.37.6 Newsletters
        • 9.37.7 Publicity
        • 9.37.8 Public Involvement
        • 9.37.9 Contractor and Architect-Engineer Professional Associations
      • 9.38 Employee Motivation
      • 9.39 Substance Abuse Programs
      • 9.40 Job Site Crime
      • 9.41 Employee Training Programs
      • 9.42 Summary and Conclusions
      • Chapter 9 Review Questions
  • Chapter 10 Project Management and Administration
    • 10.1 Introduction
    • 10.2 Project Organization
    • 10.3 The Project Manager
    • 10.4 The Project Superintendent
    • 10.5 Field Engineer
    • 10.6 Owner Project Representative
    • 10.7 Job Site Computers
    • 10.8 Aspects of Project Management
    • 10.9 Field Productivity
    • 10.10 Project Administration
    • 10.11 Project Meetings
    • 10.12 Schedule of Owner Payments
    • 10.13 Shop Drawings
    • 10.14 Approval of the Shop Drawings
    • 10.15 Quality Control
    • 10.16 Total Quality Management
    • 10.17 Materials Management
    • 10.18 Expediting
    • 10.19 Deliveries
    • 10.20 Receiving
    • 10.21 Inspection of Materials
    • 10.22 Subcontractor Scheduling
    • 10.23 Record Drawings
    • 10.24 Disbursement Controls
    • 10.25 Job Records
    • 10.26 The Daily job Log
    • 10.27 Claims and Disputes
    • 10.28 Claims in the Construction Industry
    • 10.29 Alternative Dispute Resolution (ADR)
    • 10.30 National Construction Dispute Resolution Committee (NCDRC)
    • 10.31 Arbitration
    • 10.32 Arbitration Procedure
    • 10.33 Mediation
    • 10.34 Mini-Trials
    • 10.35 Dispute Review Boards
    • 10.36 Neutral Evaluation
    • 10.37 Settlement Conferences
    • 10.38 Partnering
    • 10.39 Lean Construction
    • 10.40 Summary and Conclusions
    • Chapter 10 Review Questions
  • Chapter 11 Project Time Management
    • 11.1 Introduction
    • 11.2 The Critical Path Method
    • 11.3 General Considerations
    • 11.4 Project Planning
    • 11.5 Precedence Notation
    • 11.6 The Precedence Diagram
    • 11.7 Example Problem 1
    • 11.8 The Network Format
    • 11.9 Project Scheduling
    • 11.10 Activity Durations
    • 11.11 Time Contingency
    • 11.12 Example Problem 2
    • 11.13 Network Computations
    • 11.14 Early Activity Times
    • 11.15 Project Duration
    • 11.16 Late Activity Times
    • 11.17 Total Float
    • 11.18 The Critical Path
    • 11.19 Free Float
    • 11.20 Least-Cost Project Shortening
    • 11.21 Time-Scaled Networks
    • 11.22 Significance of Floats
    • 11.23 The Early-Start Schedule
    • 11.24 Bar Charts
    • 11.25 Resource Scheduling
    • 11.26 Progress Monitoring
    • 11.27 Progress Analysis
    • 11.28 Schedule Updating
    • 11.29 Fast-Tracking
    • 11.30 Computers and Time Management
    • 11.31 Delay Claims
    • 11.32 Summary and Conclusions
    • Chapter 11 Review Questions
  • Chapter 12 Project Cost Management
    • 12.1 Introduction
    • 12.2 Project Cost Control
    • 12.3 Data for Estimating
    • 12.4 Accounting Codes
    • 12.5 Job Cost Accounts
    • 12.6 Monthly Cost Reports
    • 12.7 Project Overhead
    • 12.8 Labor and Equipment Costs
    • 12.9 Cost Accounting
    • 12.10 Labor and Equipment Budget
    • 12.11 Cost Accounting Reports
    • 12.12 Labor Time Cards
    • 12.13 Time Card Preparation
    • 12.14 Measurement of Work Quantities
    • 12.15 Forms of Labor Reports
    • 12.16 Weekly Labor Cost Reports
    • 12.17 Equipment Cost
    • 12.18 Equipment Time Cards
    • 12.19 Equipment Cost Reports
    • 12.20 Other Equipment Charges to Projecst
    • 12.21 Cost Information and Field Supervisors
    • 12.22 Cost Control
    • 12.23 Information for Estimating
    • 12.24 Computer Application
    • 12.25 Summary and Conclusions
    • Chapter 12 Review Questions
  • Chapter 13 Labor Law
    • 13.1 Introduction
    • 13.2 History of Law of Labor Relations
    • 13.3 The Norris-Laguardia Act
    • 13.4 The National Labor Relations Act
    • 13.5 The Labor Management Relations Act
    • 13.6 The Labor-Management Reporting and Disclosure Act
    • 13.7 Coverage of the National Labor Relations Act
    • 13.8 The National Labor Relations Board
    • 13.9 Representation Elections
    • 13.10 Employer Unfair Labor Practices
    • 13.11 Union Unfair Labor Practices
    • 13.12 Charges of Unfair Labor Practices
    • 13.13 Remedies
    • 13.14 Union-Shop Agreements
    • 13.15 Prehire Agreements
    • 13.16 Union Hiring Halls
    • 13.17 Secondary Boycotts
    • 13.18 Common Situs Picketing
    • 13.19 Subcontractor Agreements
    • 13.20 Prefabrication Clauses
    • 13.21 Jurisdictional Disputes
    • 13.22 NLRB Jurisdictional Settlement
    • 13.23 Voluntary Jurisdictional Settlement Plans
    • 13.24 Payments to Employee Representatives
    • 13.25 Political Contributions
    • 13.26 The Civil Rights Act of 1964
    • 13.27 Executive Order 11246
    • 13.28 The Age Discrimination in Employment Act
    • 13.29 The Davis-Bacon Act
    • 13.30 Davis-Bacon Administration
    • 13.31 The Copeland Act
    • 13.32 The Fair Labor Standards Act
    • 13.33 The Contract Work Hours and Safety Standards Act
    • 13.34 The Hobbs Act
    • 13.35 Immigration Reform and Control Act
    • 13.36 The National Apprenticeship Act
    • 13.37 The Drug-Free Workplace Act
    • 13.38 Family and Medical Leave Act
    • 13.39 Americans With Disabilities Act (ADA)
    • 13.40 Erisa
    • 13.41 Summary and Conclusions
    • Chapter 13 Review Questions
  • Chapter 14 Labor Relations
    • 14.1 The Construction Worker
    • 14.2 Employment in the Construction Industry
    • 14.3 Employee Benefits
    • 14.4 The Union Contractor
    • 14.5 The Role of the Unions
    • 14.6 Union History
    • 14.7 Construction Unions
    • 14.8 The Local Union
    • 14.9 Local Union Autonomy
    • 14.10 Union Work Rules
    • 14.11 The Business Agent
    • 14.12 Collective Bargaining
    • 14.13 Patterns of Bargaining
    • 14.14 Withdrawal From Bargaining Unit
    • 14.15 The Bargaining Process
    • 14.16 Labor Agreements
    • 14.17 Geographical Coverage of Agreements
    • 14.18 Project Agreements
    • 14.19 National Agreements
    • 14.20 The Federal Mediation and Conciliation Service
    • 14.21 Employer Lockouts
    • 14.22 Wages and Hours
    • 14.23 Administration of the Labor Contract
    • 14.24 Damage Suits
    • 14.25 Prejob Conferences
    • 14.26 The Merit-Shop Contractor
    • 14.27 Sources of Open-Shop Labor
    • 14.28 Apprenticeship Programs
    • 14.29 Nonapprenticeship Training Programs
    • 14.30 Supervisory Training
    • 14.31 Present Construction Industry Status
    • 14.32 Dual-Shop Operation
    • 14.33 Union Reaction to Open Shop
    • 14.34 Summary and Conclusions
    • Chapter 14 Review Questions
  • Chapter 15 Project Safety
    • 15.1 Introduction
    • 15.2 The Cost of Construction Accidents
    • 15.3 Safety Legislation
    • 15.4 State Safety Codes
    • 15.5 Federal Health and Safety Acts
    • 15.6 The Occupational Safety and Health Act (OSHA)
    • 15.7 Site Inspections by OSHA
    • 15.8 Penalties Under OSHA
    • 15.9 OSHA Hazard Communication Standard
    • 15.10 Multiemployer Work Sites
    • 15.11 Contract Safety Requirements
    • 15.12 Work Injury and Illness Recording
    • 15.13 Work Injury and Illness Rates
    • 15.14 OSHA and Industry Trade Associations, Construction Companies, and Individual Workers are Makin
    • 15.15 Economic Benefits of Safety
    • 15.16 Safety Services of Contractor Associations
    • 15.17 The Role of Management in Safety
    • 15.18 The Company Safety Program
    • 15.19 The Project Safety Plan
    • 15.20 Owners’ Requirements Regarding Safety Policies and Plans
    • 15.21 The Field Supervisor
    • 15.22 Accident Records
    • 15.23 Protection of the Public
    • 15.24 The Cost of a Safety Program
    • 15.25 Summary and Conclusions
    • Chapter 15 Review Questions
  • Appendix A Instructions to Bidders
  • Appendix B AIA Document B101-2007 Standard Form of Agreement between Owner and Architect
  • Appendix C Construction Specification Institute MasterFormat 2014
  • Appendix D AIA Document A201-2007 General Conditions of the Contract for Construction
  • Appendix E Supplementary Conditions
  • Appendix F Sample Lump-Sum Proposal Form, with Reference to Addenda, and Alternates
  • Appendix G AIA Document A101-2007 Standard Form of Agreement between Owner and Contractor Where the
  • Appendix H AIA Document A102-2007, Standard Form of Agreement between Owner and Contractor Where the
  • Appendix I AIA Document A310-2010 Bid Bond
  • Appendix J AIA Document A312-2010 Performance Bond
  • Appendix K AIA Document A312-2010 Payment Bond
  • Appendix L AGC Document 655 Standard Form of Agreement between Contractor and Subcontractor
  • Appendix M AIA A401-2007 Standard Form of Agreement between Contractor and Subcontractor
  • Appendix N Construction Industry Arbitration Rules and Mediation Procedures of the American Arbitrat
  • Appendix O Typical Construction Company General Ledger Accounts
  • Index
  • EULA

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Construction Contracting: A Practical Guide to Company Management

Vörumerki: John Wiley
Vörunúmer: 9781119019978
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8.290 kr.
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8.290 kr.