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The Practice of Computing Using Python, Global Edition

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Efnisyfirlit

  • Inside Front Cover
  • Title Page
  • Copyright Page
  • Dedication
  • Brief Contents
  • Contents
  • Videonotes
  • Preface
  • Acknowledgments For the Global Edition
  • PREFACE TO THE SECOND EDITION
    • 1.0.1 Data Manipulation
    • 1.0.2 Problem Solving and Case Studies
    • 1.0.3 Code Examples
    • 1.0.4 Interactive Sessions
    • 1.0.5 Exercises and Programming Projects
    • 1.0.6 Self-Test Exercises
    • 1.0.7 Programming Tips
  • PART 1 THINKING ABOUT COMPUTING
    • Chapter 0 The Study of Computer Science
      • 0.1 Why Computer Science?
        • 0.1.1 Importance of Computer Science
        • 0.1.2 Computer Science Around You
        • 0.1.3 Computer “Science”
        • 0.1.4 Computer Science Through Computer Programming
      • 0.2 The Difficulty and Promise of Programming
        • 0.2.1 Difficulty 1: Two Things at Once
        • 0.2.2 Difficulty 2: What Is a Good Program?
        • 0.2.3 The Promise of a Computer Program
      • 0.3 Choosing a Computer Language
        • 0.3.1 Different Computer Languages
        • 0.3.2 Why Python?
        • 0.3.3 Is Python the Best Language?
      • 0.4 What Is Computation?
      • 0.5 What Is a Computer?
        • 0.5.1 Computation in Nature
        • 0.5.2 The Human Computer
      • 0.6 The Modern, Electronic Computer
        • 0.6.1 It’s the Switch!
        • 0.6.2 The Transistor
      • 0.7 A High-Level Look at a Modern Computer
      • 0.8 Representing Data
        • 0.8.1 Binary Data
        • 0.8.2 Working with Binary
        • 0.8.3 Limits
        • 0.8.4 Representing Letters
        • 0.8.5 Representing Other Data
        • 0.8.6 What Does a Number Represent?
        • 0.8.7 How to Talk About Quantities of Data
        • 0.8.8 HowMuch Data Is That?
      • 0.9 Overview of Coming Chapters
  • PART 2 STARTING TO PROGRAM
    • Chapter 1 Beginnings
      • 1.1 Practice, Practice, Practice
      • 1.2 QuickStart, the Circumference Program
        • 1.2.1 Examining the Code
      • 1.3 An Interactive Session
      • 1.4 Parts of a Program
        • 1.4.1 Modules
        • 1.4.2 Statements and Expressions
        • 1.4.3 Whitespace
        • 1.4.4 Comments
        • 1.4.5 Special Python Elements: Tokens
        • 1.4.6 Naming Objects
        • 1.4.7 Recommendations on Naming
      • 1.5 Variables
        • 1.5.1 Variable Creation and Assignment
      • 1.6 Objects and Types
        • 1.6.1 Numbers
        • 1.6.2 Other Built-In Types
        • 1.6.3 Object Types: Not Variable Types
        • 1.6.4 Constructing New Values
      • 1.7 Operators
        • 1.7.1 Integer Operators
        • 1.7.2 Floating-Point Operators
        • 1.7.3 Mixed Operations
        • 1.7.4 Order of Operations and Parentheses
        • 1.7.5 Augmented Assignment Operators: A Shortcut!
      • 1.8 Your First Module, Math
      • 1.9 Developing an Algorithm
        • 1.9.1 New Rule—Testing
      • 1.10 Visual Vignette: Turtle Graphics
      • 1.11 What’s Wrong with My Code?
    • Chapter 2 Control
      • 2.1 QuickStart Control
        • 2.1.1 Selection
        • 2.1.2 Booleans for Decisions
        • 2.1.3 The if Statement
        • 2.1.4 Example: What Lead Is Safe in Basketball?
        • 2.1.5 Repetition
        • 2.1.6 Example: Finding Perfect Numbers
        • 2.1.7 Example: Classifying Numbers
      • 2.2 In-Depth Control
        • 2.2.1 True and False: Booleans
        • 2.2.2 Boolean Variables
        • 2.2.3 Relational Operators
        • 2.2.4 Boolean Operators
        • 2.2.5 Precedence
        • 2.2.6 Boolean Operators Example
        • 2.2.7 Another Word on Assignments
        • 2.2.8 The Selection Statement for Decisions
        • 2.2.9 More on Python Decision Statements
        • 2.2.10 Repetition: the while Statement
        • 2.2.11 Sentinel Loop
        • 2.2.12 Summary of Repetition
        • 2.2.13 More on the for Statement
        • 2.2.14 Nesting
        • 2.2.15 Hailstone Sequence Example
      • 2.3 Visual Vignette: Plotting Data with Pylab
        • 2.3.1 First Plot and Using a List
        • 2.3.2 More Interesting Plot: A Sine Wave
      • 2.4 Computer Science Perspectives: Minimal Universal Computing
        • 2.4.1 Minimal Universal Computing
      • 2.5 What’s Wrong with My Code?
    • Chapter 3 Algorithms and Program Development
      • 3.1 What Is an Algorithm?
        • 3.1.1 Example Algorithms
      • 3.2 Algorithm Features
        • 3.2.1 Algorithm versus Program
        • 3.2.2 Qualities of an Algorithm
        • 3.2.3 Can We Really Do All That?
      • 3.3 What Is a Program?
        • 3.3.1 Readability
        • 3.3.2 Robust
        • 3.3.3 Correctness
      • 3.4 Strategies for Program Design
        • 3.4.1 Engage and Commit
        • 3.4.2 Understand, Then Visualize
        • 3.4.3 Think Before You Program
        • 3.4.4 Experiment
        • 3.4.5 Simplify
        • 3.4.6 Stop and Think
        • 3.4.7 Relax: Give Yourself a Break
      • 3.5 A Simple Example
        • 3.5.1 Build the Skeleton
        • 3.5.2 Output
        • 3.5.3 Input
        • 3.5.4 Doing the Calculation
  • PART 3 DATA STRUCTURES AND FUNCTIONS
    • Chapter 4 Working with Strings
      • 4.1 The String Type
        • 4.1.1 The Triple-Quote String
        • 4.1.2 Nonprinting Characters
        • 4.1.3 String Representation
        • 4.1.4 Strings as a Sequence
        • 4.1.5 More Indexing and Slicing
        • 4.1.6 Strings Are Iterable
      • 4.2 String Operations
        • 4.2.1 Concatenation (+) and Repetition (*)
        • 4.2.2 Determining When + Indicates Addition or Concatenation?
        • 4.2.3 Comparison Operators
        • 4.2.4 The in Operator
        • 4.2.5 String Collections Are Immutable
      • 4.3 A Preview of Functions and Methods
        • 4.3.1 A String Method
        • 4.3.2 Determining Method Names and Method Arguments
        • 4.3.3 String Methods
        • 4.3.4 String Functions
      • 4.4 Formatted Output for Strings
        • 4.4.1 Descriptor Codes
        • 4.4.2 Width and Alignment Descriptors
        • 4.4.3 Floating-Point Precision Descriptor
      • 4.5 Control and Strings
      • 4.6 Working with Strings
        • 4.6.1 Example: Reordering a Person’s Name
        • 4.6.2 Palindromes
      • 4.7 More String Formatting
      • 4.8 Unicode
      • 4.9 A GUI to Check a Palindrome
      • 4.10 What’s Wrong with My Code?
    • Chapter 5 Functions—QuickStart
      • 5.1 What Is a Function?
        • 5.1.1 Why Have Functions?
      • 5.2 Python Functions
      • 5.3 Flow of Control with Functions
        • 5.3.1 Function Flow in Detail
        • 5.3.2 Parameter Passing
        • 5.3.3 Another Function Example
        • 5.3.4 Function Example: Area of a Triangle
        • 5.3.5 Functions Calling Functions
        • 5.3.6 When to Use a Function
        • 5.3.7 What If There Is No Return Statement?
        • 5.3.8 What If There Are Multiple Return Statements?
      • 5.4 Visual Vignette: Turtle Flag
      • 5.5 What’s Wrong with My Code?
    • Chapter 6 Files and Exceptions I
      • 6.1 What Is a File?
      • 6.2 Accessing Files: Reading Text Files
        • 6.2.1 What’s Really Happening?
      • 6.3 Accessing Files: Writing Text Files
      • 6.4 Reading and Writing Text Files in a Program
      • 6.5 File Creation and Overwriting
        • 6.5.1 Files and Functions Example: Word Puzzle
      • 6.6 First Cut, Handling Errors
        • 6.6.1 Error Names
        • 6.6.2 The try-except Construct
        • 6.6.3 try-except Flow of Control
        • 6.6.4 Exception Example
      • 6.7 Example: Counting Poker Hands
        • 6.7.1 Program to Count Poker Hands
      • 6.8 GUI to Count Poker Hands
        • 6.8.1 Count Hands Function
        • 6.8.2 The Rest of the GUI Code
      • 6.9 Error Check Float Input
      • 6.10 What’s Wrong with My Code?
    • Chapter 7 Lists and Tuples
      • 7.1 What Is a List?
      • 7.2 What You Already Know How To Do With Lists
        • 7.2.1 Indexing and Slicing
        • 7.2.2 Operators
        • 7.2.3 Functions
        • 7.2.4 List Iteration
      • 7.3 Lists Are Different than Strings
        • 7.3.1 Lists Are Mutable
        • 7.3.2 List Methods
      • 7.4 Old and New Friends: Split and Other Functions and Methods
        • 7.4.1 Split and Multiple Assignment
        • 7.4.2 List to String and Back Again, Using join
        • 7.4.3 The Sorted Function
      • 7.5 Working with Some Examples
        • 7.5.1 Anagrams
        • 7.5.2 Example: File Analysis
      • 7.6 Mutable Objects and References
        • 7.6.1 Shallow versus Deep Copy
        • 7.6.2 Mutable versus Immutable
      • 7.7 Tuples
        • 7.7.1 Tuples from Lists
        • 7.7.2 Why Tuples?
      • 7.8 Lists: The Data Structure
        • 7.8.1 Example Data Structure
        • 7.8.2 Other Example Data Structures
      • 7.9 Algorithm Example: U.S. EPA Automobile Mileage Data
        • 7.9.1 CSV Module
      • 7.10 Visual Vignette: Plotting EPA Data
      • 7.11 List Comprehension
        • 7.11.1 Comprehensions, Expressions, and the Ternary Operator
      • 7.12 Visual Vignette: More Plotting
        • 7.12.1 Pylab Arrays
        • 7.12.2 Plotting Trigonometric Functions
      • 7.13 GUI to Find Anagrams
        • 7.13.1 Function Model
        • 7.13.2 Controller
      • 7.14 What’s Wrong with My Code?
    • Chapter 8 More on Functions
      • 8.1 Scope
        • 8.1.1 Arguments, Parameters, and Namespaces
        • 8.1.2 Passing Mutable Objects
        • 8.1.3 Returning a Complex Object
        • 8.1.4 Refactoring evens
      • 8.2 Default Values and Parameters as Keywords
        • 8.2.1 Example: Default Values and Parameter Keywords
      • 8.3 Functions as Objects
        • 8.3.1 Function Annotations
        • 8.3.2 Docstrings
      • 8.4 Example: Determining a Final Grade
        • 8.4.1 The Data
        • 8.4.2 The Design
        • 8.4.3 Function: weighted_grade
        • 8.4.4 Function: parse_line
        • 8.4.5 Function: main
        • 8.4.6 Example Use
      • 8.5 Pass “by Value” or “by Reference”
      • 8.6 What’s Wrong with My Code?
    • Chapter 9 Dictionaries and Sets
      • 9.1 Dictionaries
        • 9.1.1 Dictionary Example
        • 9.1.2 Python Dictionaries
        • 9.1.3 Dictionary Indexing and Assignment
        • 9.1.4 Operators
        • 9.1.5 Ordered Dictionaries
      • 9.2 Word Count Example
        • 9.2.1 Count Words in a String
        • 9.2.2 Word Frequency for Gettysburg Address
        • 9.2.3 Output and Comments
      • 9.3 Periodic Table Example
        • 9.3.1 Working with CSV Files
        • 9.3.2 Algorithm Overview
        • 9.3.3 Functions for Divide and Conquer
      • 9.4 Sets
        • 9.4.1 History
        • 9.4.2 What’s in a Set?
        • 9.4.3 Python Sets
        • 9.4.4 Methods, Operators, and Functions for Python Sets
        • 9.4.5 Set Methods
      • 9.5 Set Applications
        • 9.5.1 Relationship between Words of Different
        • 9.5.2 Output and Comments
      • 9.6 Scope: The Full Story
        • 9.6.1 Namespaces and Scope
        • 9.6.2 Search Rule for Scope
        • 9.6.3 Local
        • 9.6.4 Global
        • 9.6.5 Built-Ins
        • 9.6.6 Enclosed
      • 9.7 Using zip to Create Dictionaries
      • 9.8 Dictionary and Set Comprehensions
      • 9.9 Visual Vignette: Bar Graph of Word Frequency
        • 9.9.1 Getting the Data Right
        • 9.9.2 Labels and the xticks Command
        • 9.9.3 Plotting
      • 9.10 GUI to Compare Files
        • 9.10.1 Controller and View
        • 9.10.2 Function Model
      • 9.11 What’s Wrong with My Code?
    • Chapter 10 More Program Development
      • 10.1 Introduction
      • 10.2 Divide and Conquer
        • 10.2.1 Top-Down Refinement
      • 10.3 The Breast Cancer Classifier
        • 10.3.1 The Problem
        • 10.3.2 The Approach: Classification
        • 10.3.3 Training and Testing the Classifier
        • 10.3.4 Building the Classifier
      • 10.4 Designing the Classifier Algorithm
        • 10.4.1 Divided, now Conquer
        • 10.4.2 Data Structures
        • 10.4.3 File Format
        • 10.4.4 The make_training_set Function
        • 10.4.5 The make_test_set Function
        • 10.4.6 The train_classifier Function
        • 10.4.7 train_classifier, Round 2
        • 10.4.8 Testing the Classifier on New Data
        • 10.4.9 The report_results Function
      • 10.5 Running the Classifier on Full Data
        • 10.5.1 Training versus Testing
      • 10.6 Other Interesting Problems
        • 10.6.1 Tag Clouds
        • 10.6.2 S&P 500 Predictions
        • 10.6.3 Predicting Religion with Flags
      • 10.7 GUI to Plot the Stock Market
        • 10.7.1 Function Model
        • 10.7.2 Controller and View
  • PART 4 CLASSES, MAKING YOUR OWN DATA STRUCTURES AND ALGORITHMS
    • Chapter 11 Introduction to Classes
      • 11.1 QuickStart: Simple Student Class
      • 11.2 Object-Oriented Programming
        • 11.2.1 Python Is Object-Oriented!
        • 11.2.2 Characteristics of OOP
      • 11.3 Working with OOP
        • 11.3.1 Class and Instance
      • 11.4 Working with Classes and Instances
        • 11.4.1 Built-In Class and Instance
        • 11.4.2 Our First Class
        • 11.4.3 Changing Attributes
        • 11.4.4 The Special Relationship Between an Instance and Class: instance-of
      • 11.5 Object Methods
        • 11.5.1 Using Object Methods
        • 11.5.2 Writing Methods
        • 11.5.3 The Special Argument self
        • 11.5.4 Methods Are the Interface to a Class Instance
      • 11.6 Fitting into the Python Class Model
        • 11.6.1 Making Programmer-Defined Classes
        • 11.6.2 A Student Class
        • 11.6.3 Python Standard Methods
        • 11.6.4 Now There Are Three: Class Designer, Programmer, and User
      • 11.7 Example: Point Class
        • 11.7.1 Construction
        • 11.7.2 Distance
        • 11.7.3 Summing Two Points
        • 11.7.4 Improving the Point Class
      • 11.8 Python and OOP
        • 11.8.1 Encapsulation
        • 11.8.2 Inheritance
        • 11.8.3 Polymorphism
      • 11.9 Python and Other OOP Languages
        • 11.9.1 Public versus Private
        • 11.9.2 Indicating Privacy Using Double Underscores (__)
        • 11.9.3 Python’s Philosophy
        • 11.9.4 Modifying an Instance
      • 11.10 What’s Wrong with My Code?
    • Chapter 12 More on Classes
      • 12.1 More About Class Properties
        • 12.1.1 Rational Number (Fraction) Class Example
      • 12.2 How Does Python Know?
        • 12.2.1 Classes, Types, and Introspection
        • 12.2.2 Remember Operator Overloading
      • 12.3 Creating Your Own Operator Overloading
        • 12.3.1 Mapping Operators to Special Methods
      • 12.4 Building the Rational Number Class
        • 12.4.1 Making the Class
        • 12.4.2 Review Fraction Addition
        • 12.4.3 Back to Adding Fractions
        • 12.4.4 Equality and Reducing Rationals
        • 12.4.5 Divide and Conquer at Work
      • 12.5 What Doesn’t Work (Yet)
        • 12.5.1 Introspection
        • 12.5.2 Repairing int + Rational Errors
      • 12.6 Inheritance
        • 12.6.1 The “Find the Attribute” Game
        • 12.6.2 Using Inheritance
        • 12.6.3 Example: The Standard Model
      • 12.7 What’s Wrong with My Code?
    • Chapter 13 Program Development with Classes
      • 13.1 Predator–Prey Problem
        • 13.1.1 The Rules
        • 13.1.2 Simulation Using Object-Oriented Programming
      • 13.2 Classes
        • 13.2.1 Island Class
        • 13.2.2 Predator and Prey, Kinds of Animals
        • 13.2.3 Predator and Prey Classes
        • 13.2.4 Object Diagram
        • 13.2.5 Filling the Island
      • 13.3 Adding Behavior
        • 13.3.1 Refinement: Add Movement
        • 13.3.2 Refinement: Time Simulation Loop
      • 13.4 Refinement: Eating, Breeding, and Keeping Time
        • 13.4.1 Improved Time Loop
        • 13.4.2 Breeding
        • 13.4.3 Eating
        • 13.4.4 The Tick of the Clock
      • 13.5 Refinement: How Many Times to Move?
      • 13.6 Visual Vignette: Graphing Population Size
  • PART 5 BEING A BETTER PROGRAMMER
    • Chapter 14 Files and Exceptions II
      • 14.1 More Details on Files
        • 14.1.1 Other File Access Methods, Reading
        • 14.1.2 Other File Access Methods, Writing
        • 14.1.3 Universal New Line Format
        • 14.1.4 Moving Around in a File
        • 14.1.5 Closing a File
        • 14.1.6 The with Statement
        • 14.1.7 Text File Encodings
      • 14.2 CSV Files
        • 14.2.1 CSV Module
        • 14.2.2 CSV Reader
        • 14.2.3 CSV Writer
        • 14.2.4 Example: Update Some Grades
      • 14.3 Module: os
        • 14.3.1 Directory (Folder) Structure
        • 14.3.2 os Module Functions
        • 14.3.3 os Module Example
      • 14.4 More on Exceptions
        • 14.4.1 Basic Exception Handling
        • 14.4.2 A Simple Example
        • 14.4.3 Events
        • 14.4.4 A Philosophy Concerning Exceptions
      • 14.5 Exception: else and finally
        • 14.5.1 finally and with
        • 14.5.2 Example: Refactoring the Reprompting of a File Name
      • 14.6 More on Exceptions
        • 14.6.1 Raise
        • 14.6.2 Create Your Own
      • 14.7 Example: Password Manager
    • Chapter 15 Recursion: Another Control Mechanism
      • 15.1 What Is Recursion?
      • 15.2 Mathematics and Rabbits
      • 15.3 Let’s Write Our Own: Reversing a String
      • 15.4 How Does Recursion Actually Work?
        • 15.4.1 Stack Data Structure
        • 15.4.2 Stacks and Function Calls
        • 15.4.3 A Better Fibonacci
      • 15.5 Recursion in Figures
        • 15.5.1 Recursive Tree
        • 15.5.2 Sierpinski Triangles
      • 15.6 Recursion to Non-recursion
      • 15.7 GUI for Turtle Drawing
        • 15.7.1 Using Turtle Graphics to Draw
        • 15.7.2 Function Model
        • 15.7.3 Controller and View
    • Chapter 16 Other Fun Stuff with Python
      • 16.1 Numbers
        • 16.1.1 Fractions
        • 16.1.2 Decimal
        • 16.1.3 Complex Numbers
        • 16.1.4 Statistics Module
        • 16.1.5 Random Numbers
      • 16.2 Even More on Functions
        • 16.2.1 Having a Varying Number of Parameters
        • 16.2.2 Iterators and Generators
        • 16.2.3 Other Functional Programming Ideas
        • 16.2.4 Some Functional Programming Tools
        • 16.2.5 Decorators: Functions Calling Functions
      • 16.3 Classes
        • 16.3.1 Properties
        • 16.3.2 Serializing an Instance: pickle
      • 16.4 Other Things in Python
        • 16.4.1 Data Types
        • 16.4.2 Built-in Modules
        • 16.4.3 Modules on the Internet
    • Chapter 17 The End, or Perhaps the Beginning
  • APPENDICES
    • Appendix A Getting and Using Python
      • A.1 About Python
        • A.1.1 History
        • A.1.2 Python 3
        • A.1.3 Python Is Free and Portable
        • A.1.4 Installing Anaconda
        • A.1.5 Starting Our Python IDE: Spyder
        • A.1.6 Working with Python
        • A.1.7 Making a Program
      • A.2 The IPython Console
        • A.2.1 Anatomy of an iPython Session
        • A.2.2 Your Top Three iPython Tips
        • A.2.3 Completion and the Tab Key
        • A.2.4 The ? Character
        • A.2.5 More iPython Tips
      • A.3 Some Conventions for This Book
        • A.3.1 Interactive Code
        • A.3.2 Program: Written Code
        • A.3.3 Combined Program and Output
      • A.4 Summary
    • Appendix B Simple Drawing with Turtle Graphics
      • B.0.1 What Is a Turtle?
      • B.0.2 Motion
      • B.0.3 Drawing
      • B.0.4 Color
      • B.0.5 Drawing with Color
      • B.0.6 Other Commands
      • B.1 Tidbits
        • B.1.1 Reset/Close the Turtle Window
    • Appendix C What’s Wrong with My Code?
      • C.1 It’s Your Fault!
        • C.1.1 Kinds of Errors
        • C.1.2 “Bugs” and Debugging
      • C.2 Debugging
        • C.2.1 Testing for Correctness
        • C.2.2 Probes
        • C.2.3 Debugging with Spyder Example 1
        • C.2.4 Debugging Example 1 Using print()
        • C.2.5 Debugging with Spyder Example 2
        • C.2.6 More Debugging Tips
      • C.3 More about Testing
        • C.3.1 Testing Is Hard!
        • C.3.2 Importance of Testing
        • C.3.3 Other Kinds of Testing
      • C.4 What’s Wrong with My Code?
        • C.4.1 Chapter 1: Beginnings
        • C.4.2 Chapter 2: Control
        • C.4.3 Chapter 4: Strings
        • C.4.4 Chapter 5: Functions
        • C.4.5 Chapter 6: Files and Exceptions
        • C.4.6 Chapter 7: Lists and Tuples
        • C.4.7 Chapter 8: More Functions
        • C.4.8 Chapter 9: Dictionaries
        • C.4.9 Chapter 11: Classes I
        • C.4.10 Chapter 12: Classes II
    • Appendix D Pylab: A Plotting and Numeric Tool
      • D.1 Plotting
      • D.2 Working with pylab
        • D.2.1 Plot Command
        • D.2.2 Colors, Marks, and Lines
        • D.2.3 Generating X-Values
        • D.2.4 Plot Properties
        • D.2.5 Tick Labels
        • D.2.6 Legend
        • D.2.7 Bar Graphs
        • D.2.8 Histograms
        • D.2.9 Pie Charts
        • D.2.10How Powerful Is pylab?
    • Appendix E Quick Introduction to Web-based User Interfaces
      • E.0.1 MVC Architecture
      • E.1 Flask
      • E.2 QuickStart Flask, Hello World
        • E.2.1 What Just Happened?
        • E.2.2 Multiple Routes
        • E.2.3 Stacked Routes, Passing Address Arguments
      • E.3 Serving Up Real HTML Pages
        • E.3.1 A Little Bit of HTML
        • E.3.2 HTML Tags
        • E.3.3 Flask Returning Web Pages
        • E.3.4 Getting Arguments into Our Web Pages
      • E.4 Active Web Pages
        • E.4.1 Forms in wtforms
        • E.4.2 A Good Example Goes a Long Way
        • E.4.3 Many Fields Example
      • E.5 Displaying and Updating Images
      • E.6 Odds and Ends
    • Appendix F Table of UTF-8 One Byte Encodings
    • Appendix G Precedence
    • Appendix H Naming Conventions
      • H.1 Python Style Elements
      • H.2 Naming Conventions
        • H.2.1 Our Added Naming Conventions
      • H.3 Other Python Conventions
    • Appendix I Check Yourself Solutions
      • I.1 Chapter 1
        • Variables and Assignment
        • Types and Operators
      • I.2 Chapter 2
        • Basic Control Check
        • Loop Control Check
        • More Control Check
        • for and range Check
      • I.3 Chapter 4
        • Slicing Check
        • String Comparison Check
      • I.4 Chapter 5
        • Simple Functions Check
      • I.5 Chapter 6
        • Exception Check
        • Function Practice with Strings
      • I.6 Chapter 7
        • Basic Lists Check
        • Lists and Strings Check
        • Mutable List Check
      • I.7 Chapter 8
        • Passing Mutables Check
        • More on Functions Check
      • I.8 Chapter 9
        • Dictionary Check
        • Set Check
      • I.9 Chapter 11
        • Basic Classes Check
        • Defining Special Methods
      • I.10 Chapter 12
        • Check Defining Your Own Operators
      • I.11 Chapter 14
        • Basic File Operations
        • Basic Exception Control
  • INDEX
    • A
    • B
    • C
    • D
    • E
    • F
    • G
    • H
    • I
    • J
    • K
    • L
    • M
    • N
    • O
    • P
    • Q
    • R
    • S
    • T
    • U
    • V
    • W
    • Y
    • Z

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    Bókahillan þín er þitt svæði og þar eru bækurnar þínar geymdar. Þú kemst í bókahilluna þína hvar og hvenær sem er í tölvu eða snjalltæki. Einfalt og þægilegt!

    Þú kemst í bækurnar hvar sem er
    Þú getur nálgast allar raf(skóla)bækurnar þínar á einu augabragði, hvar og hvenær sem er í bókahillunni þinni. Engin taska, enginn kyndill og ekkert vesen (hvað þá yfirvigt).

    Auðvelt að fletta og leita
    Þú getur flakkað milli síðna og kafla eins og þér hentar best og farið beint í ákveðna kafla úr efnisyfirlitinu. Í leitinni finnur þú orð, kafla eða síður í einum smelli.

    Glósur og yfirstrikanir
    Þú getur auðkennt textabrot með mismunandi litum og skrifað glósur að vild í rafbókina. Þú getur jafnvel séð glósur og yfirstrikanir hjá bekkjarsystkinum og kennara ef þeir leyfa það. Allt á einum stað.

    Hvað viltu sjá? / Þú ræður hvernig síðan lítur út
    Þú lagar síðuna að þínum þörfum. Stækkaðu eða minnkaðu myndir og texta með multi-level zoom til að sjá síðuna eins og þér hentar best í þínu námi.



    Fleiri góðir kostir
    - Þú getur prentað síður úr bókinni (innan þeirra marka sem útgefandinn setur)
    - Möguleiki á tengingu við annað stafrænt og gagnvirkt efni, svo sem myndbönd eða spurningar úr efninu
    - Auðvelt að afrita og líma efni/texta fyrir t.d. heimaverkefni eða ritgerðir
    - Styður tækni sem hjálpar nemendum með sjón- eða heyrnarskerðingu
Eiginleikar
Vörumerki: Pearson
Vörunúmer: 9781292166681
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The Practice of Computing Using Python, Global Edition

Vörumerki: Pearson
Vörunúmer: 9781292166681
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8.290 kr.