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Pearson Baccalaureate Psychology 2nd Edition

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Efnisyfirlit

  • Contents
  • Introduction
  • Introduction to research
  • A: Biological approach to understanding behaviour
    • Chapter 1: The brain and behaviour
      • 1.1: Techniques used to study the brain in relation to behaviour
        • 1.1.1: MRI (structural imaging)
        • 1.1.2: PET scan (functional imaging)
        • 1.1.3: fMRI (functional imaging)
      • 1.2: Localization
        • 1.2.1: Defining localization
        • 1.2.2: Limitations of localization
      • 1.3: Neuroplasticity
      • 1.4: Neurotransmitters and their effect on behaviour
        • 1.4.1: Acetylcholine
        • 1.4.2: Serotonin
    • Chapter 2: Hormones and pheromones and behaviour
      • 2.1: Hormones and behaviour
        • 2.1.1: Oxytocin
        • 2.1.2: Testosterone
      • 2.2: Pheromones and behaviour
        • 2.2.1: Establishing validity
    • Chapter 3: Genetics and behaviour
      • 3.1: Genes and behaviour
        • 3.1.1: Major depressive disorder
        • 3.1.2: Factors that affect gene expression
      • 3.2: Genetic similarities
      • 3.3: Evolutionary explanations for behaviour
        • 3.3.1: Attachment
        • 3.3.2: Major Depressive Disorder
    • Chapter 4: Research methods: biological approach
      • 4.1: Experiments
      • 4.2: Natural experiments
      • 4.3: Correlations research
      • 4.4: Quasi-experiments
    • Chapter 5: Ethical considerations: biological approach
      • 5.1: The use of non-invasive techniques
      • 5.2: Informed consent
      • 5.3: Minor deceptions
      • 5.4: Genetic research
    • Chapter 6: The role of animal research in understanding human behaviour (HL)
      • 6.1: The value of animal models
        • 6.1.1: The manipulation and isolation of variables
        • 6.1.2: The benefit of a relatively quick breeding cycle
        • 6.1.3: The benefit of animal post-mortem study
        • 6.1.4: Caution in using animals to understand human behaviour
      • 6.2: Measuring the value of animal research
      • 6.3: Ethical considerations
  • B: Cognitive approach to understanding behaviour
    • Chapter 7: Cognitive processing
      • 7.1: Models of memory
        • 7.1.1: The multi-store model of memory
        • 7.1.2: The working memory model
        • 7.1.3: Long-term memory
        • 7.1.4: Cross-cultural studies
      • 7.2: Schema theory
        • 7.2.1: Effort after meaning
        • 7.2.2: Pattern recognition
        • 7.2.3: Stereotyping
        • 7.2.4: Evaluation of schema theory
      • 7.3: Thinking and decision making
        • 7.3.1: Systems of thinking
        • 7.3.2: Irrational thinking and decision making
        • 7.3.3: Cultural considerations
        • 7.3.4: The influence of emotions on thinking and decision making
    • Chapter 8: Reliability of cognitive processes
      • 8.1: Reconstructive memory
        • 8.1.1: Constructing and deconstructing memories
        • 8.1.2: False memories
        • 8.1.3: Confabulation
        • 8.1.4: Schema processing and errors in memory
        • 8.1.5: Implications of the unreliability of memory
      • 8.2: Biases in thinking and decision making
        • 8.2.1: Heuristics
        • 8.2.2: Confirmation bias
        • 8.2.3: The illusory correlation
        • 8.2.4: Implicit personality theories
        • 8.2.5: Algorithms
    • Chapter 9: Emotion and cognition
      • 9.1: The influence of emotion on cognitive processes
        • 9.1.1: Valence theory
        • 9.1.2: Arousal theory
        • 9.1.3: The two-factor theory of emotion
        • 9.1.4: Flashbulb memory
    • Chapter 10: Research methods: cognitive approach
      • 10.1: Field experiments
      • 10.2: Interviews and questionnaires
    • Chapter 11: Ethical considerations: cognitiveapproach
    • Chapter 12: Cognitive processing in the digital world (HL)
      • 12.1: The infl uence of digital technology on cognitive processes
        • 12.1.1: Attention
        • 12.1.2: Memory
        • 12.1.3: Thinking
      • 12.2: The positive and negative effects of modern technology on cognitive processes
        • 12.2.1: Positive effects of technology on memory, attention, and emotion
        • 12.2.2: Negative effects of technology on memory, attention, and emotion
      • 12.3: Methods to study interactions between digital technology and cognitive processes
        • 12.3.1: Animal research and fMRI scans
        • 12.3.2: Meta-analysis
        • 12.3.3: Self-report questionnaires
        • 12.3.4: Longitudinal studies
        • 12.3.5: Experiments
  • C: Sociocultural approach to understanding behaviour
    • Chapter 13: The individual and the group
      • 13.1: Social identity theory
        • 13.1.1: Ingroup bias
        • 13.1.2: Responses to intergroup inequality
        • 13.1.3: Stereotyping
        • 13.1.4: Limitations of SIT
      • 13.2: Social cognitive theory
        • 13.2.1: Social cognitive theory and self-efficacy
        • 13.2.2: Social cognitive theory and aggression
        • 13.2.3: Social cognitive theory and mass infl uence
        • 13.2.4: Evaluation of social cognitive theory
      • 13.3: Stereotypes
        • 13.3.1: Development of stereotypes
        • 13.3.2: Correspondence bias and stereotype formation
        • 13.3.3: Illusory correlation and stereotype formation
        • 13.3.4: Upbringing and stereotype formation
        • 13.3.5: Ingroup and outgroup relations and stereotype formation
        • 13.3.6: Stereotype threat
    • Chapter 14: Cultural origins of behaviour and cognition
      • 14.1: Culture and its influence on behaviour
        • 14.1.1: Role of culture in behaviour
        • 14.1.2: Social class and behaviour
        • 14.1.3: Counting and arithmetic
        • 14.1.4: Surface and deep culture
      • 14.2: Cultural dimensions
        • 14.2.1: Chinese cultural values
        • 14.2.2: Cultural dimensions
    • Chapter 15: Cultural influences on individual attitudes, identity, and behaviours
      • 15.1: Enculturation
        • 15.1.1: Enculturation’s effect on language
      • 15.2: Acculturation
    • Chapter 16: Research methods: sociocultural approach
      • 16.1: Quasi-experiments
      • 16.2: Correlation study using a self-report questionnaire
      • 16.3: Emic and etic approaches to research
    • Chapter 17: Ethical considerations: sociocultural approach
      • 17.1: Studies involving children
      • 17.2: Cross-cultural studies and stereotypes
      • 17.3: Cross-cultural studies and researcher effect
      • 17.4: Unethical use of research
    • Chapter 18: The influence of globalization on individual behaviour (HL)
      • 18.1: Globalization may influence culture
        • 18.1.1: Bicultural identities
        • 18.1.2: Self-selected cultures
      • 18.2: The effect of the interaction of local and global influences on behaviour
        • 18.2.1: Identity hybridisation
        • 18.2.2: Identity confusion
        • 18.2.3: Postponed adulthood
      • 18.3: Methods used to study the influence of globalization on behaviour
  • D: Abnormal psychology
    • Chapter 19: Factors influencing diagnosis
      • 19.1: Defining abnormality
        • 19.1.1: Biological approach
        • 19.1.2: Psychological approach
      • 19.2: Strengths and limitations of definitions
        • 19.2.1: Statistical abnormality
        • 19.2.2: Individual considerations
        • 19.2.3: Political and cultural considerations
        • 19.2.4: Concluding comments
      • 19.3: Classification systems
        • 19.3.1: The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM)
        • 19.3.2: The International Classifi cation of Diseases
        • 19.3.3: The Chinese Classification of Mental Disorders
      • 19.4: The role of clinical bias in diagnosis
        • 19.4.1: Potential reasons for clinical bias
        • 19.4.2: Perceived group identity
      • 19.5: Validity and reliability of diagnosis
        • 19.5.1: Validity
        • 19.5.2: Reliability
    • Chapter 20: Etiology of abnormal psychology
      • 20.1: Explanations and prevalence rates for disorders
        • 20.1.1: Anorexia nervosa
        • 20.1.2: Major depressive disorder
    • Chapter 21: Treatment of disorders
      • 21.1: Biological treatments
        • 21.1.1: Biological treatments for anorexia nervosa
        • 21.1.2: Biological treatments for major depressive disorder
      • 21.2: Psychological treatments
        • 21.2.1: Cognitive-behavioural therapy
        • 21.2.2: Interpersonal psychotherapy
        • 21.2.3: Anorexia nervosa and CBT
        • 21.2.4: Anorexia nervosa and IPT
        • 21.2.5: Major depressive disorder and CBT
        • 21.2.6: Major depressive disorder and IPT
      • 21.3 The role of culture in treatment
        • 21.3.1: The culture of the patient
        • 21.3.2: The culture of the clinician
      • 21.4: Assessing the effectiveness of treatment(s)
        • 21.4.1: Assessing the effectiveness of treatments: macro level of analysis
        • 21.4.2: Assessing the effectiveness of treatments: Micro level of analysis
    • Chapter 22: Research methods: abnormal psychology
      • 22.1: The use of control groups
      • 22.2: Being aware of participant expectations
      • 22.3: The use of placebos or sham treatments
      • 22.4: The use of pilot studies
      • 22.5: The use of meta-analysis
      • 22.6: The importance of reflexivity
      • 22.7: The issue of generalization
    • Chapter 23: Ethical considerations: abnormal psychology
      • 23.1: Research Ethics Committee
      • 23.2: Intervention
      • 23.3: Cultural competence
      • 23.4: Patient’s psychological state
      • 23.5: Informed consen
      • 23.6: Protecting participants from harm
      • 23.7: Anonymity and confi dentiality
  • E: Developmental psychology
    • Chapter 24: Influences on cognitive and social development
      • 24.1: The role of peers and play
        • 24.1.1: The role of peers in social development
        • 24.1.2: Peer contagion and antisocial behaviour
        • 24.1.3: The role of play on cognitive development
      • 24.2: Childhood trauma and resilience
        • 24.2.1: Trauma
        • 24.2.2: Resilience
      • 24.3: Poverty and socioeconomic status
        • 24.3.1: Poverty
        • 24.3.2: Diet
    • Chapter 25: Developing an identity
      • 25.1: Attachment
        • 25.1.1: Assumptions of attachment research and models
        • 25.1.2: Attachment theory
        • 25.1.3: Animal studies
      • 25.2: Gender identity and social roles
        • 25.2.1: Sociocultural factors that explain the formation of gender identity and roles
        • 25.2.2: Cognitive factors that explain the formation of gender identity and roles
        • 25.2.3: Biological factors that explain the formation of gender identity and social roles
      • 25.3: Development of empathy and theory of mind
        • 25.3.1: Mentalization
        • 25.3.2: Biological determinants of mentalization and empathy
        • 25.3.3: Sociocultural determinants of mentalization and empathy
    • Chapter 26: Developing as a learner
      • 26.1: Cognitive development
        • 26.1.1: Piaget’s theory of cognitive development
        • 26.1.2: Vygotsky’s theory of cognitive development
      • 26.2: Brain development
        • 26.2.1: Maturation and development of the brain
        • 26.2.2: Brain plasticity
        • 26.2.3: Learning to be social
    • Chapter 27: Approaches to research: developmental psychology
      • 27.1: Working with young children
      • 27.2: Longitudinal studies
      • 27.3: Correlations versus experiments
      • 27.4: The use of technology to monitor cognition
        • 27.4.1: Technology use for mass surveys
    • Chapter 28: Ethical considerations: developmental psychology
      • 28.1: Working with children
      • 28.2: Guaranteeing anonymity
      • 28.3: The use of animals
  • F: Health psychology
    • Chapter 29: Determinants of health
      • 29.1: Biopsychosocial model of health and well-being
        • 29.1.1: The biomedical model
        • 29.1.2: A systems approach to explaining and treating health
      • 29.2: Dispositional factors and health beliefs
        • 29.2.1: What is addiction?
        • 29.2.2: Dispositional and situational factors
        • 29.2.3: Health beliefs
      • 29.3: Risk and protective factors
        • 29.3.1: Risk factors
        • 29.3.2: Biological consequences of stress
        • 29.3.3: Protective factors for coping with stress
    • Chapter 30: Health problems
      • 30.1: Explanations of health problems
        • 30.1.1: Biological factors
        • 30.1.2: Cognitive factors
        • 30.1.3: Sociocultural factors
      • 30.2: Prevalence rates of health problems
    • Chapter 31: Promoting health
      • 31.1: Health promotion
        • 31.1.1: The health belief model
        • 31.1.2: The theory of reasoned action and the theory of planned behaviour
      • 31.2: Effectiveness of health promotion programmes
        • 31.2.1: What is a health promotion programme?
        • 31.2.2: Considering populations
        • 31.2.3: Considering outcomes
    • Chapter 32: Approaches to research: health psychology
      • 32.1: Researcher bias
      • 32.2: Participant expectations
      • 32.3: The importance of reflexivity
      • 32.4: Choosing an appropriate methodology
        • 32.4.1: Triangulation
        • 32.4.2: Measurement
      • 32.5: The issue of generalization
      • 32.6: The problem of cause and effect
    • Chapter 33: Ethical considerations: health psychology
      • 33.1: Informed consent
      • 33.2: Protecting participants from (psychological or emotional) harm
      • 33.3: Anonymity and confi dentiality
  • G: Psychology of human relationships
    • 34: Personal relationships
      • 34.1: Formation of personal relationships
        • 34.1.1: The role of sociocultural factors in the formation of relationships
        • 34.1.2: The role of biological factors in the formation of relationships
        • 34.1.3: The role of cognitive factors in the formation of relationships
      • 34.2: Role of communication in personal relationships
        • 34.2.1: Communicating openness and assurance
        • 34.2.2: Managing negativity
        • 34.2.3: The role of listening
        • 34.2.4: Gender differences in communication styles
      • 34.3: Why relationships change or end
        • 34.3.1: Communication changes
        • 34.3.2: Cognitive change
        • 34.3.3: Sociocultural change
    • 35: Group dynamics
      • 35.1: Theoretical foundations
        • 35.1.1: Biological infl uences
        • 35.1.2: Social identity theory
      • 35.2: Cooperation and competition
        • 35.2.1: Cooperation
        • 35.2.2: Competition
      • 35.3: Prejudice and discrimination
        • 35.3.1: Prejudice
        • 35.3.2: Discrimination
      • 35.4: Origins of conflict and conflict resolution
        • 35.4.1: Origins of confl ict
        • 35.4.2: Approaches to resolving conflict
    • 36: Social responsibility
      • 36.1: Bystanderism
        • 36.1.1: Diffusion of responsibility and pluralistic ignorance
        • 36.1.2: Perceived similarity
        • 36.1.3: Culture and geographical location
      • 36.2: Prosocial behaviour
        • 36.2.1: Sociocultural factors
        • 36.2.2: Cognitive and emotional factors
        • 36.2.3: Biological factors
      • 36.3: Promoting prosocial behaviour
        • 36.3.1: Sociocultural considerations
        • 36.3.2: Cognitive and emotional considerations
        • 36.3.3: Biological considerations
        • 36.3.4: Interactive approach
        • 36.3.5: Strategies for promoting prosocial behaviour
    • Chapter 37: Approaches to research: psychology of human relationships
      • 37.1: Participant expectations
      • 37.2: The importance of refl exivity
      • 37.3: Choosing an appropriate methodology
        • 37.3.1: Types of triangulation
      • 37.4: The issue of generalization
    • Chapter 38: Ethical considerations: psychology of human relationships
      • 38.1: Informed consent
      • 38.2: Protecting participants from (psychological or emotional) harm
      • 38.3: Anonymity and confi dentiality
  • Theory of knowledge
    • Can models and theories be used to understand and predict human behaviour?
    • Does a researcher’s choice of methodology affect the reliability or credibility of research?
    • Is what we know about human behaviour limited by our ethical considerations?
    • Are emotions universal?
    • Are the methods of the natural sciences applicable in the human sciences?
  • Internal assessment
    • Making sure your study is ethical
    • Making sure your study is an experiment
    • Group work
    • Organization and presentation
    • How to write an internal assessment
  • Higher level paper 3
    • Question 1
    • Question 2
    • Question 3
    • Research methods
    • Sampling methods
    • Ethical considerations
    • Generalizing findings
    • Achieving credibility
    • The use of reflexivity
    • The use of triangulation
    • Avoiding bias
    • Practice scenarios
  • Extended essay
    • Developing a research question
    • Analysis and evaluation
    • Advice on structure and paragraphing
    • Citations and referencing
  • Appendix
  • Researchers’ index
  • General index
  • Back Cover

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Vörumerki: Pearson
Vörunúmer: 9781292371764
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Pearson Baccalaureate Psychology 2nd Edition

Vörumerki: Pearson
Vörunúmer: 9781292371764
Rafræn bók. Uppl. sendar á netfangið þitt eftir kaup

Veldu vöru

3.990 kr.
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