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Database Systems: A Practical Approach to Design, Implementation, and Management, Global Edition

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  • Title
  • Copyright
  • Contents
  • Preface
  • Part 1 Background
    • Chapter 1 Introduction to Databases
      • 1.1 Introduction
      • 1.2 Traditional File-Based Systems
        • 1.2.1 File-Based Approach
        • 1.2.2 Limitations of the File-Based Approach
      • 1.3 Database Approach
        • 1.3.1 The Database
        • 1.3.2 The Database Management System (DBMS)
        • 1.3.3 (Database) Application Programs
        • 1.3.4 Components of the DBMS Environment
        • 1.3.5 Database Design: The Paradigm Shift
      • 1.4 Roles in the Database Environment
        • 1.4.1 Data and Database Administrators
        • 1.4.2 Database Designers
        • 1.4.3 Application Developers
        • 1.4.4 End-Users
      • 1.5 History of Database Management Systems
      • 1.6 Advantages and Disadvantages of DBMSs
      • Chapter Summary
      • Review Questions
      • Exercises
    • Chapter 2 Database Environment
      • 2.1 The Three-Level ANSI-SPARC Architecture
        • 2.1.1 External Level
        • 2.1.2 Conceptual Level
        • 2.1.3 Internal Level
        • 2.1.4 Schemas, Mappings, and Instances
        • 2.1.5 Data Independence
      • 2.2 Database Languages
        • 2.2.1 The Data Definition Language (DDL)
        • 2.2.2 The Data Manipulation Language (DML)
        • 2.2.3 Fourth-Generation Languages (4GLs)
      • 2.3 Data Models and Conceptual Modeling
        • 2.3.1 Object-Based Data Models
        • 2.3.2 Record-Based Data Models
        • 2.3.3 Physical Data Models
        • 2.3.4 Conceptual Modeling
      • 2.4 Functions of a DBMS
      • Chapter Summary
      • Review Questions
      • Exercises
    • Chapter 3 Database Architectures and the Web
      • 3.1 Multi-user DBMS Architectures
        • 3.1.1 Teleprocessing
        • 3.1.2 File-Server Architecture
        • 3.1.3 Traditional Two-Tier Client–Server Architecture
        • 3.1.4 Three-Tier Client–Server Architecture
        • 3.1.5 N-Tier Architectures
        • 3.1.6 Middleware
        • 3.1.7 Transaction Processing Monitors
      • 3.2 Web Services and Service-Oriented Architectures
        • 3.2.1 Web Services
        • 3.2.2 Service-Oriented Architectures (SOA)
      • 3.3 Distributed DBMSs
      • 3.4 Data Warehousing
      • 3.5 Cloud Computing
        • 3.5.1 Benefits and Risks of Cloud Computing
        • 3.5.2 Cloud-Based Database Solutions
      • 3.6 Components of a DBMS
      • 3.7 Oracle Architecture
        • 3.7.1 Oracle’s Logical Database Structure
        • 3.7.2 Oracle’s Physical Database Structure
      • Chapter Summary
      • Review Questions
      • Exercises
  • Part 2 The Relational Model and Languages
    • Chapter 4 The Relational Model
      • 4.1 Brief History of the Relational Model
      • 4.2 Terminology
        • 4.2.1 Relational Data Structure
        • 4.2.2 Mathematical Relations
        • 4.2.3 Database Relations
        • 4.2.4 Properties of Relations
        • 4.2.5 Relational Keys
        • 4.2.6 Representing Relational Database Schemas
      • 4.3 Integrity Constraints
        • 4.3.1 Nulls
        • 4.3.2 Entity Integrity
        • 4.3.3 Referential Integrity
        • 4.3.4 General Constraints
      • 4.4 Views
        • 4.4.1 Terminology
        • 4.4.2 Purpose of Views
        • 4.4.3 Updating Views
      • Chapter Summary
      • Review Questions
      • Exercises
    • Chapter 5 Relational Algebra and Relational Calculus
      • 5.1 The Relational Algebra
        • 5.1.1 Unary Operations
        • 5.1.2 Set Operations
        • 5.1.3 Join Operations
        • 5.1.4 Division Operation
        • 5.1.5 Aggregation and Grouping Operations
        • 5.1.6 Summary of the Relational Algebra Operations
      • 5.2 The Relational Calculus
        • 5.2.1 Tuple Relational Calculus
        • 5.2.2 Domain Relational Calculus
      • 5.3 Other Languages
      • Chapter Summary
      • Review Questions
      • Exercises
    • Chapter 6 SQL: Data Manipulation
      • 6.1 Introduction to SQL
        • 6.1.1 Objectives of SQL
        • 6.1.2 History of SQL
        • 6.1.3 Importance of SQL
        • 6.1.4 Terminology
      • 6.2 Writing SQL Commands
      • 6.3 Data Manipulation
        • 6.3.1 Simple Queries
        • 6.3.2 Sorting Results (ORDER BY Clause)
        • 6.3.3 Using the SQL Aggregate Functions
        • 6.3.4 Grouping Results (GROUP BY Clause)
        • 6.3.5 Subqueries
        • 6.3.6 ANY and ALL
        • 6.3.7 Multi-table Queries
        • 6.3.8 EXISTS and NOT EXISTS
        • 6.3.9 Combining Result Tables (UNION, INTERSECT, EXCEPT)
        • 6.3.10 Database Updates
      • Chapter Summary
      • Review Questions
      • Exercises
    • Chapter 7 SQL: Data Definition
      • 7.1 The ISO SQL Data Types
        • 7.1.1 SQL Identifiers
        • 7.1.2 SQL Scalar Data Types
      • 7.2 Integrity Enhancement Feature
        • 7.2.1 Required Data
        • 7.2.2 Domain Constraints
        • 7.2.3 Entity Integrity
        • 7.2.4 Referential Integrity
        • 7.2.5 General Constraints
      • 7.3 Data Definition
        • 7.3.1 Creating a Database
        • 7.3.2 Creating a Table (CREATE TABLE)
        • 7.3.3 Changing a Table Definition (ALTER TABLE)
        • 7.3.4 Removing a Table (DROP TABLE)
        • 7.3.5 Creating an Index (CREATE INDEX)
        • 7.3.6 Removing an Index (DROP INDEX)
      • 7.4 Views
        • 7.4.1 Creating a View (CREATE VIEW)
        • 7.4.2 Removing a View (DROP VIEW)
        • 7.4.3 View Resolution
        • 7.4.4 Restrictions on Views
        • 7.4.5 View Updatability
        • 7.4.6 WITH CHECK OPTION
        • 7.4.7 Advantages and Disadvantages of Views
        • 7.4.8 View Materialization
      • 7.5 Transactions
        • 7.5.1 Immediate and Deferred Integrity Constraints
      • 7.6 Discretionary Access Control
        • 7.6.1 Granting Privileges to Other Users (GRANT)
        • 7.6.2 Revoking Privileges from Users (REVOKE)
      • Chapter Summary
      • Review Questions
      • Exercises
    • Chapter 8 Advanced SQL
      • 8.1 The SQL Programming Language
        • 8.1.1 Declarations
        • 8.1.2 Assignments
        • 8.1.3 Control Statements
        • 8.1.4 Exceptions in PL/SQL
        • 8.1.5 Cursors in PL/SQL
      • 8.2 Subprograms, Stored Procedures, Functions, and Packages
      • 8.3 Triggers
      • 8.4 Recursion
      • Chapter Summary
      • Review Questions
      • Exercises
    • Chapter 9 Object-Relational DBMSs
      • 9.1 Advanced Database Applications
      • 9.2 Weaknesses of RDBMSs
      • 9.3 Storing Objects in a Relational Database
        • 9.3.1 Mapping Classes to Relations
        • 9.3.2 Accessing Objects in the Relational Database
      • 9.4 Introduction to Object-Relational Database Systems
      • 9.5 SQL:2011
        • 9.5.1 Row Types
        • 9.5.2 User-Defined Types
        • 9.5.3 Subtypes and Supertypes
        • 9.5.4 User-Defined Routines
        • 9.5.5 Polymorphism
        • 9.5.6 Reference Types and Object Identity
        • 9.5.7 Creating Tables
        • 9.5.8 Querying Data
        • 9.5.9 Collection Types
        • 9.5.10 Typed Views
        • 9.5.11 Persistent Stored Modules
        • 9.5.12 Triggers
        • 9.5.13 Large Objects
        • 9.5.14 Recursion
      • 9.6 Object-Oriented Extensions in Oracle
        • 9.6.1 User-Defined Data Types
        • 9.6.2 Manipulating Object Tables
        • 9.6.3 Object Views
        • 9.6.4 Privileges
      • Chapter Summary
      • Review Questions
      • Exercises
  • Part 3 Database Analysis and Design
    • Chapter 10 Database System Development Lifecycle
      • 10.1 The Information Systems Lifecycle
      • 10.2 The Database System Development Lifecycle
      • 10.3 Database Planning
      • 10.4 System Definition
        • 10.4.1 User Views
      • 10.5 Requirements Collection and Analysis
        • 10.5.1 Centralized Approach
        • 10.5.2 View Integration Approach
      • 10.6 Database Design
        • 10.6.1 Approaches to Database Design
        • 10.6.2 Data Modeling
        • 10.6.3 Phases of Database Design
      • 10.7 DBMS Selection
        • 10.7.1 Selecting the DBMS
      • 10.8 Application Design
        • 10.8.1 Transaction Design
        • 10.8.2 User Interface Design Guidelines
      • 10.9 Prototyping
      • 10.10 Implementation
      • 10.11 Data Conversion and Loading
      • 10.12 Testing
      • 10.13 Operational Maintenance
      • 10.14 CASE Tools
      • Chapter Summary
      • Review Questions
      • Exercises
    • Chapter 11 Database Analysis and the DreamHome Case Study
      • 11.1 When Are Fact-Finding Techniques Used?
      • 11.2 What Facts Are Collected?
      • 11.3 Fact-Finding Techniques
        • 11.3.1 Examining Documentation
        • 11.3.2 Interviewing
        • 11.3.3 Observing the Enterprise in Operation
        • 11.3.4 Research
        • 11.3.5 Questionnaires
      • 11.4 Using Fact-Finding Techniques: A
        • 11.4.1 The DreamHome Case Study—An Overview of the Current System
        • 11.4.2 The DreamHome Case Study—Database Planning
        • 11.4.3 The DreamHome Case Study—System Definition
        • 11.4.4 The DreamHome Case Study—Requirements Collection and Analysis
        • 11.4.5 The DreamHome Case Study—Database Design
      • Chapter Summary
      • Review Questions
      • Exercises
    • Chapter 12 Entity–Relationship Modeling
      • 12.1 Entity Types
      • 12.2 Relationship Types
        • 12.2.1 Degree of Relationship Type
        • 12.2.2 Recursive Relationship
      • 12.3 Attributes
        • 12.3.1 Simple and Composite Attributes
        • 12.3.2 Single-valued and Multi-valued Attributes
        • 12.3.3 Derived Attributes
        • 12.3.4 Keys
      • 12.4 Strong and Weak Entity Types
      • 12.5 Attributes on Relationships
      • 12.6 Structural Constraints
        • 12.6.1 One-to-One (1:1) Relationships
        • 12.6.2 One-to-Many (1:*) Relationships
        • 12.6.3 Many-to-Many (*:*) Relationships
        • 12.6.4 Multiplicity for Complex Relationships
        • 12.6.5 Cardinality and Participation Constraints
      • 12.7 Problems with ER Models
        • 12.7.1 Fan Traps
        • 12.7.2 Chasm Traps
      • Chapter Summary
      • Review Questions
      • Exercises
    • Chapter 13 Enhanced Entity–Relationship Modeling
      • 13.1 Specialization/Generalization
        • 13.1.1 Superclasses and Subclasses
        • 13.1.2 Superclass/Subclass Relationships
        • 13.1.3 Attribute Inheritance
        • 13.1.4 Specialization Process
        • 13.1.5 Generalization Process
        • 13.1.6 Constraints on Specialization/Generalization
        • 13.1.7 Worked Example of using Specialization/Generalization to Model the Branch View of the DreamHo
      • 13.2 Aggregation
      • 13.3 Composition
      • Chapter Summary
      • Review Questions
      • Exercises
    • Chapter 14 Normalization
      • 14.1 The Purpose of Normalization
      • 14.2 How Normalization Supports Database Design
      • 14.3 Data Redundancy and Update Anomalies
        • 14.3.1 Insertion Anomalies
        • 14.3.2 Deletion Anomalies
        • 14.3.3 Modification Anomalies
      • 14.4 Functional Dependencies
        • 14.4.1 Characteristics of Functional Dependencies
        • 14.4.2 Identifying Functional Dependencies
        • 14.4.3 Identifying the Primary Key for a Relation Using Functional Dependencies
      • 14.5 The Process of Normalization
      • 14.6 First Normal Form (1NF)
      • 14.7 Second Normal Form (2NF)
      • 14.8 Third Normal Form (3NF)
      • 14.9 General Definitions of 2NF and 3NF
      • Chapter Summary
      • Review Questions
      • Exercises
    • Chapter 15 Advanced Normalization
      • 15.1 More on Functional Dependencies
        • 15.1.1 Inference Rules for Functional Dependencies
        • 15.1.2 Minimal Sets of Functional Dependencies
      • 15.2 Boyce–Codd Normal Form (BCNF)
        • 15.2.1 Definition of BCNF
      • 15.3 Review of Normalization Up to BCNF
      • 15.4 Fourth Normal Form (4NF)
        • 15.4.1 Multi-Valued Dependency
        • 15.4.2 Definition of Fourth Normal Form
      • 15.5 Fifth Normal Form (5NF)
        • 15.5.1 Lossless-Join Dependency
        • 15.5.2 Definition of Fifth Normal Form
      • Chapter Summary
      • Review Questions
      • Exercises
  • Part 4 Methodology
    • Chapter 16 Methodology—Conceptual Database Design
      • 16.1 Introduction to the Database Design Methodology
        • 16.1.1 What Is a Design Methodology?
        • 16.1.2 Conceptual, Logical, and Physical Database Design
        • 16.1.3 Critical Success Factors in Database Design
      • 16.2 Overview of the Database Design Methodology
      • 16.3 Conceptual Database Design Methodology
      • Step 1: Build Conceptual Data Model
      • Chapter Summary
      • Review Questions
      • Exercises
    • Chapter 17 Methodology—Logical Database Design for the Relational Model
      • 17.1 Logical Database Design Methodology for the Relational Model
      • Step 2: Build Logical Data Model
      • Chapter Summary
      • Review Questions
      • Exercises
    • Chapter 18 Methodology—Physical Database Design for Relational Databases
      • 18.1 Comparison of Logical and Physical Database Design
      • 18.2 Overview of the Physical Database Design Methodology
      • 18.3 The Physical Database Design Methodology for Relational Databases
      • Step 3: Translate Logical Data Model for Target DBMS
      • Step 4: Design File Organizations and Indexes
      • Step 5: Design User Views
      • Step 6: Design Security Mechanisms
      • Chapter Summary
      • Review Questions
      • Exercises
    • Chapter 19 Methodology—Monitoring and Tuning the Operational System
      • 19.1 Denormalizing and Introducing Controlled Redundancy
      • Step 7: Consider the Introduction of Controlled Redundancy
      • 19.2 Monitoring the System to Improve Performance
      • Step 8: Monitor and Tune the Operational System
      • Chapter Summary
      • Review Questions
      • Exercises
  • Part 5 Selected Database Issues
    • Chapter 20 Security and Administration
      • 20.1 Database Security
        • 20.1.1 Threats
      • 20.2 Countermeasures—Computer-Based Controls
        • 20.2.1 Authorization
        • 20.2.2 Access Controls
        • 20.2.3 Views
        • 20.2.4 Backup and Recovery
        • 20.2.5 Integrity
        • 20.2.6 Encryption
        • 20.2.7 RAID (Redundant Array of Independent Disks)
      • 20.3 Security in Microsoft Office Access DBMS
      • 20.4 Security in Oracle DBMS
      • 20.5 DBMSs and Web Security
        • 20.5.1 Proxy Servers
        • 20.5.2 Firewalls
        • 20.5.3 Message Digest Algorithms and Digital Signatures
        • 20.5.4 Digital Certificates
        • 20.5.5 Kerberos
        • 20.5.6 Secure Sockets Layer and Secure HTTP
        • 20.5.7 Secure Electronic Transactions and Secure Transaction Technology
        • 20.5.8 Java Security
        • 20.5.9 ActiveX Security
      • 20.6 Data Administration and Database Administration
        • 20.6.1 Data Administration
        • 20.6.2 Database Administration
        • 20.6.3 Comparison of Data and Database Administration
      • Chapter Summary
      • Review Questions
      • Exercises
    • Chapter 21 Professional, Legal, and Ethical Issues in Data Management
      • 21.1 Defining Legal and Ethical Issues in IT
        • 21.1.1 Defining Ethics in the Context of IT
        • 21.1.2 The Difference Between Ethical and Legal Behavior
        • 21.1.3 Ethical Behavior in IT
      • 21.2 Legislation and Its Impact on the IT Function
        • 21.2.1 Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) Regulation National Market System (NMS)
        • 21.2.2 The Sarbanes-Oxley Act, COBIT, and COSO
        • 21.2.3 The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act
        • 21.2.4 The European Union (EU) Directive on Data Protection of 1995
        • 21.2.5 The United Kingdom’s Data Protection Act of 1998
        • 21.2.6 Access to Information Laws
        • 21.2.7 International Banking—Basel II Accords
      • 21.3 Establishing a Culture of Legal and Ethical Data Stewardship
        • 21.3.1 Developing an Organization-Wide Policy for Legal and Ethical Behavior
        • 21.3.2 Professional Organizations and Codes of Ethics
        • 21.3.3 Developing an Organization-Wide Policy for Legal and Ethical Behavior for DreamHome
      • 21.4 Intellectual Property
        • 21.4.1 Patent
        • 21.4.2 Copyright
        • 21.4.3 Trademark
        • 21.4.4 Intellectual Property Rights Issues for Software
        • 21.4.5 Intellectual Property Rights Issues for Data
      • Chapter Summary
      • Review Questions
      • Exercises
    • Chapter 22 Transaction Management
      • 22.1 Transaction Support
        • 22.1.1 Properties of Transactions
        • 22.1.2 Database Architecture
      • 22.2 Concurrency Control
        • 22.2.1 The Need for Concurrency Control
        • 22.2.2 Serializability and Recoverability
        • 22.2.3 Locking Methods
        • 22.2.4 Deadlock
        • 22.2.5 Timestamping Methods
        • 22.2.6 Multiversion Timestamp Ordering
        • 22.2.7 Optimistic Techniques
        • 22.2.8 Granularity of Data Items
      • 22.3 Database Recovery
        • 22.3.1 The Need for Recovery
        • 22.3.2 Transactions and Recovery
        • 22.3.3 Recovery Facilities
        • 22.3.4 Recovery Techniques
        • 22.3.5 Recovery in a Distributed DBMS
      • 22.4 Advanced Transaction Models
        • 22.4.1 Nested Transaction Model
        • 22.4.2 Sagas
        • 22.4.3 Multilevel Transaction Model
        • 22.4.4 Dynamic Restructuring
        • 22.4.5 Workflow Models
      • 22.5 Concurrency Control and Recovery in Oracle
        • 22.5.1 Oracle’s Isolation Levels
        • 22.5.2 Multiversion Read Consistency
        • 22.5.3 Deadlock Detection
        • 22.5.4 Backup and Recovery
      • Chapter Summary
      • Review Questions
      • Exercises
    • Chapter 23 Query Processing
      • 23.1 Overview of Query Processing
      • 23.2 Query Decomposition
      • 23.3 Heuristical Approach to Query Optimization
        • 23.3.1 Transformation Rules for the Relational Algebra Operations
        • 23.3.2 Heuristical Processing Strategies
      • 23.4 Cost Estimation for the Relational Algebra Operations
        • 23.4.1 Database Statistics
        • 23.4.2 Selection Operation (S = sp(R))
        • 23.4.3 Join Operation (T = (R ?F S))
        • 23.4.4 Projection Operation (S = p A1, A2, . . . , A m(R))
        • 23.4.5 The Relational Algebra Set Operations (T = R ? S, T = R n S, T = R – S)
      • 23.5 Enumeration of Alternative Execution Strategies
        • 23.5.1 Pipelining
        • 23.5.2 Linear Trees
        • 23.5.3 Physical Operators and Execution Strategies
        • 23.5.4 Reducing the Search Space
        • 23.5.5 Enumerating Left-Deep Trees
        • 23.5.6 Semantic Query Optimization
        • 23.5.7 Alternative Approaches to Query Optimization
        • 23.5.8 Distributed Query Optimization
      • 23.6 Query Processing and Optimization
        • 23.6.1 New Index Types
      • 23.7 Query Optimization in Oracle
        • 23.7.1 Rule-Based and Cost-Based Optimization
        • 23.7.2 Histograms
        • 23.7.3 Viewing the Execution Plan
      • Chapter Summary
      • Review Questions
      • Exercises
  • Part 6 Distributed DBMSs and Replication
    • Chapter 24 Distributed DBMSs—Concepts and Design
      • 24.1 Introduction
        • 24.1.1 Concepts
        • 24.1.2 Advantages and Disadvantages of DDBMSs
        • 24.1.3 Homogeneous and Heterogeneous DDBMSs
      • 24.2 Overview of Networking
      • 24.3 Functions and Architectures of a DDBMS
        • 24.3.1 Functions of a DDBMS
        • 24.3.2 Reference Architecture for a DDBMS
        • 24.3.3 Reference Architecture for a Federated MDBS
        • 24.3.4 Component Architecture for a DDBMS
      • 24.4 Distributed Relational Database Design
        • 24.4.1 Data Allocation
        • 24.4.2 Fragmentation
      • 24.5 Transparencies in a DDBMS
        • 24.5.1 Distribution Transparency
        • 24.5.2 Transaction Transparency
        • 24.5.3 Performance Transparency
        • 24.5.4 DBMS Transparency
        • 24.5.5 Summary of Transparencies in a DDBMS
      • 24.6 Date’s Twelve Rules for a DDBMS
      • Chapter Summary
      • Review Questions
      • Exercises
    • Chapter 25 Distributed DBMSs—Advanced Concepts
      • 25.1 Distributed Transaction Management
      • 25.2 Distributed Concurrency Control
        • 25.2.1 Objectives
        • 25.2.2 Distributed Serializability
        • 25.2.3 Locking Protocols
      • 25.3 Distributed Deadlock Management
      • 25.4 Distributed Database Recovery
        • 25.4.1 Failures in a Distributed Environment
        • 25.4.2 How Failures Affect Recovery
        • 25.4.3 Two-Phase Commit (2PC)
        • 25.4.4 Three-Phase Commit (3PC)
        • 25.4.5 Network Partitioning
      • 25.5 The X/Open Distributed Transaction Processing Model
      • 25.6 Distributed Query Optimization
        • 25.6.2 Distributed Joins
        • 25.6.3 Global Optimization
      • 25.7 Distribution in Oracle
        • 25.7.1 Oracle’s DDBMS Functionality
      • Chapter Summary
      • Review Questions
      • Exercises
    • Chapter 26 Replication and Mobile Databases
      • 26.1 Introduction to Data Replication
        • 26.1.1 Applications of Replication
        • 26.1.2 Replication Model
        • 26.1.3 Functional Model of Replication Protocols
        • 26.1.4 Consistency
      • 26.2 Replication Architecture
        • 26.2.1 Kernel-Based Replication
        • 26.2.2 Middleware-Based Replication
        • 26.2.3 Processing of Updates
        • 26.2.4 Propagation of Updates
        • 26.2.5 Update Location (Data Ownership)
        • 26.2.6 Termination Protocols
      • 26.3 Replication Schemes
        • 26.3.1 Eager Primary Copy
        • 26.3.2 Lazy Primary Copy
        • 26.3.3 Eager Update Anywhere
        • 26.3.4 Lazy Update Anywhere
        • 26.3.5 Update Anywhere with Uniform Total Order Broadcast
        • 26.3.6 SI and Uniform Total Order Broadcast Replication
      • 26.4 Introduction to Mobile Databases
        • 26.4.1 Mobile DBMSs
        • 26.4.2 Issues with Mobile DBMSs
      • 26.5 Oracle Replication
        • 26.5.1 Oracle’s Replication Functionality
      • Chapter Summary
      • Review Questions
      • Exercises
  • Part 7 Object DBMSs
    • Chapter 27 Object-Oriented DBMSs—Concepts and Design
      • 27.1 Next-Generation Database Systems
      • 27.2 Introduction to OODBMSs
        • 27.2.1 Definition of Object-Oriented DBMSs
        • 27.2.2 Functional Data Models
        • 27.2.3 Persistent Programming Languages
        • 27.2.4 Alternative Strategies for Developing an OODBMS
      • 27.3 Persistence in OODBMSs
        • 27.3.1 Pointer Swizzling Techniques
        • 27.3.2 Accessing an Object
        • 27.3.3 Persistence Schemes
        • 27.3.4 Orthogonal Persistence
      • 27.4 Issues in OODBMSs
        • 27.4.1 Transactions
        • 27.4.2 Versions
        • 27.4.3 Schema Evolution
        • 27.4.4 Architecture
        • 27.4.5 Benchmarking
      • 27.5 Advantages and Disadvantages of OODBMSs
        • 27.5.1 Advantages
        • 27.5.2 Disadvantages
      • 27.6 Comparison of ORDBMS and OODBMS
      • 27.7 Object-Oriented Database Design
        • 27.7.1 Comparison of Object-Oriented Data Modeling
        • 27.7.2 Relationships and Referential Integrity
        • 27.7.3 Behavioral Design
      • 27.8 Object-Oriented Analysis and Design with UML
        • 27.8.1 UML Diagrams
        • 27.8.2 Usage of UML in the Methodology for Database Design
      • Chapter Summary
      • Review Questions
      • Exercises
    • Chapter 28 Object-Oriented DBMSs—Standards and Systems
      • 28.1 Object Management Group
        • 28.1.1 Background
        • 28.1.2 The Common Object Request Broker Architecture
        • 28.1.3 Other OMG Specifications
        • 28.1.4 Model-Driven Architecture
      • 28.2 Object Data Standard ODMG 3.0, 1999
        • 28.2.1 Object Data Management Group
        • 28.2.2 The Object Model
        • 28.2.3 The Object Definition Language
        • 28.2.4 The Object Query Language
        • 28.2.5 Other Parts of the ODMG Standard
        • 28.2.6 Mapping the Conceptual Design to a Logical (Object-Oriented) Design
      • 28.3 ObjectStore
        • 28.3.1 Architecture
        • 28.3.2 Building an ObjectStore Application
        • 28.3.3 Data Definition in ObjectStore
        • 28.3.4 Data Manipulation in ObjectStore
      • Chapter Summary
      • Review Questions
      • Exercises
  • Part 8 The Web and DBMSs
    • Chapter 29 Web Technology and DBMSs
      • 29.1 Introduction to the Internet and the Web
        • 29.1.1 Intranets and Extranets
        • 29.1.2 e-Commerce and e-Business
      • 29.2 The Web
        • 29.2.1 HyperText Transfer Protocol
        • 29.2.2 HyperText Markup Language
        • 29.2.3 Uniform Resource Locators
        • 29.2.4 Static and Dynamic Web Pages
        • 29.2.5 Web Services
        • 29.2.6 Requirements for Web–DBMS Integration
        • 29.2.7 Advantages and Disadvantages of the Web–DBMS Approach
        • 29.2.8 Approaches to Integrating the Web and DBMSs
      • 29.3 Scripting Languages
        • 29.3.1 JavaScript and JScript
        • 29.3.2 VBScript
        • 29.3.3 Perl and PHP
      • 29.4 Common Gateway Interface (CGI)
        • 29.4.1 Passing Information to a CGI Script
        • 29.4.2 Advantages and Disadvantages of CGI
      • 29.5 HTTP Cookies
      • 29.6 Extending the Web Server
        • 29.6.1 Comparison of CGI and API
      • 29.7 Java
        • 29.7.1 JDBC
        • 29.7.2 SQLJ
        • 29.7.3 Comparison of JDBC and SQLJ
        • 29.7.4 Container-Managed Persistence (CMP)
        • 29.7.5 Java Data Objects (JDO)
        • 29.7.6 JPA (Java Persistence API)
        • 29.7.7 Java Servlets
        • 29.7.8 JavaServer Pages
        • 29.7.9 Java Web Services
      • 29.8 Microsoft’s Web Platform
        • 29.8.1 Universal Data Access
        • 29.8.2 Active Server Pages and ActiveX Data Objects
        • 29.8.3 Remote Data Services
        • 29.8.4 Comparison of ASP and JSP
        • 29.8.5 Microsoft .NET
        • 29.8.6 Microsoft Web Services
      • 29.9 Oracle Internet Platform
        • 29.9.1 Oracle WebLogic Server
        • 29.9.2 Oracle Metadata Repository
        • 29.9.3 Oracle Identity Management
        • 29.9.4 Oracle Portal
        • 29.9.5 Oracle WebCenter
        • 29.9.6 Oracle Business Intelligence (BI) Discoverer
        • 29.9.7 Oracle SOA (Service-Oriented Architecture) Suite
      • Chapter Summary
      • Review Questions
      • Exercises
    • Chapter 30 Semistructured Data and XML
      • 30.1 Semistructured Data
        • 30.1.1 Object Exchange Model (OEM)
        • 30.1.2 Lore and Lorel
      • 30.2 Introduction to XML
        • 30.2.1 Overview of XML
        • 30.2.2 Document Type Definitions (DTDs)
      • 30.3 XML-Related Technologies
        • 30.3.1 DOM and SAX Interfaces
        • 30.3.2 Namespaces
        • 30.3.3 XSL and XSLT
        • 30.3.4 XPath (XML Path Language)
        • 30.3.5 XPointer (XML Pointer Language)
        • 30.3.6 XLink (XML Linking Language)
        • 30.3.7 XHTML
        • 30.3.8 Simple Object Access Protocol (SOAP)
        • 30.3.9 Web Services Description Language (WSDL)
        • 30.3.10 Universal Discovery, Description, and Integration (UDDI)
        • 30.3.11 JSON (JavaScript Object Notation)
      • 30.4 XML Schema
        • 30.4.1 Resource Description Framework (RDF)
      • 30.5 XML Query Languages
        • 30.5.1 Extending Lore and Lorel to Handle XML
        • 30.5.2 XML Query Working Group
        • 30.5.3 XQuery—A Query Language for XML
        • 30.5.4 XML Information Set
        • 30.5.5 XQuery 1.0 and XPath 2.0 Data Model (XDM)
        • 30.5.6 XQuery Update Facility 1.0
        • 30.5.7 Formal Semantics
      • 30.6 XML and Databases
        • 30.6.1 Storing XML in Databases
        • 30.6.2 XML and SQL
        • 30.6.3 Native XML Databases
      • 30.7 XML in Oracle
      • Chapter Summary
      • Review Questions
      • Exercises
  • Part 9 Business Intelligence
    • Chapter 31 Data Warehousing Concepts
      • 31.1 Introduction to Data Warehousing
        • 31.1.1 The Evolution of Data Warehousing
        • 31.1.2 Data Warehousing Concepts
        • 31.1.3 Benefits of Data Warehousing
        • 31.1.4 Comparison of OLTP Systems and Data Warehousing
        • 31.1.5 Problems of Data Warehousing
        • 31.1.6 Real-Time Data Warehouse
      • 31.2 Data Warehouse Architecture
        • 31.2.1 Operational Data
        • 31.2.2 Operational Data Store
        • 31.2.3 ETL Manager
        • 31.2.4 Warehouse Manager
        • 31.2.5 Query Manager
        • 31.2.6 Detailed Data
        • 31.2.7 Lightly and Highly Summarized Data]
        • 31.2.8 Archive/Backup Data
        • 31.2.9 Metadata
        • 31.2.10 End-User Access Tools
      • 31.3 Data Warehousing Tools and Technologies
        • 31.3.1 Extraction, Transformation, and Loading (ETL)
        • 31.3.2 Data Warehouse DBMS
        • 31.3.3 Data Warehouse Metadata
        • 31.3.4 Administration and Management Tools
      • 31.4 Data Mart
        • 31.4.1 Reasons for Creating a Data Mart
      • 31.5 Data Warehousing and Temporal Databases
        • 31.5.1 Temporal Extensions to the SQL Standard
      • 31.6 Data Warehousing Using Oracle
        • 31.6.1 Warehouse Features in Oracle 11g
        • 31.6.2 Oracle Support for Temporal Data
      • Chapter Summary
      • Review Questions
      • Exercises
    • Chapter 32 Data Warehousing Design
      • 32.1 Designing a Data Warehouse Database
      • 32.2 Data Warehouse Development Methodologies
      • 32.3 Kimball’s Business Dimensional Lifecycle
      • 32.4 Dimensionality Modeling
        • 32.4.1 Comparison of DM and ER models
      • 32.5 The Dimensional Modeling Stage of Kimball’s Business Dimensional Lifecycle
        • 32.5.1 Create a High-Level Dimensional Model (Phase I)
        • 32.5.2 Identify All Dimension Attributes for the Dimensional Model (Phase II)
      • 32.6 Data Warehouse Development Issues
      • 32.7 Data Warehousing Design Using Oracle
        • 32.7.1 Oracle Warehouse Builder Components
        • 32.7.2 Using Oracle Warehouse Builder
        • 32.7.3 Warehouse Builder Features in Oracle 11g
      • Chapter Summary
      • Review Questions
      • Exercises
    • Chapter 33 OLAP
      • 33.1 Online Analytical Processing
        • 33.1.1 OLAP Benchmarks
      • 33.2 OLAP Applications
      • 33.3 Multidimensional Data Model
        • 33.3.1 Alternative Multidimensional Data Representations
        • 33.3.2 Dimensional Hierarchy
        • 33.3.3 Multidimensional Operations
        • 33.3.4 Multidimensional Schemas
      • 33.4 OLAP Tools
        • 33.4.1 Codd’s Rules for OLAP Tools
        • 33.4.2 OLAP Server—Implementation Issues
        • 33.4.3 Categories of OLAP Servers
      • 33.5 OLAP Extensions to the SQL Standard
        • 33.5.1 Extended Grouping Capabilities
        • 33.5.2 Elementary OLAP Operators
      • 33.6 Oracle OLAP
        • 33.6.1 Oracle OLAP Environment
        • 33.6.2 Platform for Business Intelligence Applications
        • 33.6.3 Oracle Database
        • 33.6.4 Oracle OLAP
        • 33.6.5 Performance
        • 33.6.6 System Management
        • 33.6.7 System Requirements
        • 33.6.8 OLAP Features in Oracle 11g
      • Chapter Summary
      • Review Questions
      • Exercises
    • Chapter 34 Data Mining
      • 34.1 Data Mining
      • 34.2 Data Mining Techniques
        • 34.2.1 Predictive Modeling
        • 34.2.2 Database Segmentation
        • 34.2.3 Link Analysis
        • 34.2.4 Deviation Detection
      • 34.3 The Data Mining Process
        • 34.3.1 The CRISP-DM Model
      • 34.4 Data Mining Tools
      • 34.5 Data Mining and Data Warehousing
      • 34.6 Oracle Data Mining (ODM)
        • 34.6.1 Data Mining Capabilities
        • 34.6.2 Enabling Data Mining Applications
        • 34.6.3 Predictions and Insights
        • 34.6.4 Oracle Data Mining Environment
        • 34.6.5 Data Mining Features in Oracle 11g
      • Chapter Summary
      • Review Questions
      • Exercises
    • Appendices
      • A Users’ Requirements Specification for DreamHome Case Study
        • A.1 Branch User Views of DreamHome
          • A.1.1 Data Requirements
          • A.1.2 Transaction Requirements (Sample)
        • A.2 Staff User Views of DreamHome
          • A.2.1 Data Requirements
          • A.2.2 Transaction Requirements (Sample)
      • B Other Case Studies
        • B.1 The University Accommodation Office Case Study
          • B.1.1 Data Requirements
          • B.1.2 Query Transactions (Sample)
        • B.2 The EasyDrive School of Motoring Case Study
          • B.2.1 Data Requirements
          • B.2.2 Query Transactions (Sample)
        • B.3 The Wellmeadows Hospital Case Study
          • B.3.1 Data Requirements
          • B.3.2 Transaction Requirements (Sample)
      • C Alternative ER Modeling Notations
        • C.1 ER Modeling Using the Chen Notation
        • C.2 ER Modeling Using the Crow’s Feet Notation
      • D Summary of the Database Design Methodology for Relational Databases
        • Step 1: Build Conceptual Data Model
        • Step 2: Build Logical Data Model
        • Step 3: Translate Logical Data Model for Target DBMS
        • Step 4: Design File Organizations and Indexes
        • Step 5: Design User Views
        • Step 6: Design Security Mechanisms
        • Step 7: Consider the Introduction of Controlled Redundancy
        • Step 8: Monitor and Tune the Operational System
      • E Introduction to Pyrrho: A Lightweight RDBMS
        • E.1 Pyrrho Features
        • E.2 Download and Install Pyrrho
        • E.3 Getting Started
        • E.4 The Connection String
        • E.5 Pyrrho’s Security Model
        • E.6 Pyrrho SQL Syntax
  • References
  • Further Reading
  • Index

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Vörumerki: Pearson
Tilboði lýkur 26.03.2019
Vörunúmer: 9781292061849
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Database Systems: A Practical Approach to Design, Implementation, and Management, Global Edition

Vörumerki: Pearson
Tilboði lýkur 26.03.2019
Vörunúmer: 9781292061849
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