By The People

Höfundar: James A. Morone, Rogan Kersh
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By The People

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Efnisyfirlit

  • Cover
  • Title
  • Copyright
  • Dedication
  • Brief Contents
  • Contents
  • About the Authors
  • Preface
  • Acknowledgments
  • 1 The Spirit of American Politics
    • Who Governs?
    • How Does American Politics Work?
      • Ideas
      • Institutions
      • Interests
      • Individuals
      • History
    • What Does Government Do?
      • Context: Government in Society
      • No Big Government!
      • What Government Does
      • A Chronic Problem
      • The Hidden Government
      • The Best of Government
    • Who Are We?
    • Conclusion: Your Turn
    • CHAPTER SUMMARY
    • KEY TERMS
    • STUDY QUESTIONS
  • 2 The Ideas That Shape America
    • A Nation of Ideas
    • Liberty
      • “The Land of the Free”
      • The Two Sides of Liberty
      • The Idea of Freedom Is Always Changing
    • Self-Rule
      • One Side of Self-Rule: Democracy
      • Another Side of Self-Rule: A Republic
      • A Mixed System
    • Limited Government
      • The Origins of Limited Government
      • And Yet . . . Americans Keep Demanding More Government
      • Limits on Government Action
      • When Ideas Clash: Democracy and Limited Government
    • Individualism
      • Community Versus Individualism
      • The Roots of American Individualism: Opportunity and Discord
        • Golden Opportunity
        • Social Conflict
      • Who We Are: Individualism and Solidarity?
    • The American Dream
      • Spreading the Dream
      • Challenging the Dream
        • Is the System Tilted Toward the Wealthy?
        • Does the American Dream Promote the Wrong Values?
    • Equality
      • Three Types of Equality
      • How Much Economic Inequality Is Too Much?
      • Opportunity or Outcome?
    • Religion
      • Still a Religious Country
      • So Many Religions
      • Politics of Religion
    • How Do Ideas Affect Politics?
      • Ideas in American Culture
      • Ideas in Political Institutions
      • Culture or Institutions?
    • Conclusion: Culture and Institutions, Together
    • CHAPTER SUMMARY
    • KEY TERMS
    • STUDY QUESTIONS
  • 3 The Constitution
    • The Colonial Roots of the Constitution
    • Why the Colonists Revolted
      • The Colonial Complaint: Representation
      • The Conflict Begins with Blood on the Frontier
      • The Stamp Tax and the First Hints of Independence
      • The Townshend Acts Worsen the Conflict
      • The Boston Tea Party
      • Revolution!
      • A Long Legacy
    • The Declaration of Independence
      • The Principle: “We Hold These Truths . . .”
      • Grievances
    • The First American Government: The Articles of Confederation
      • Independent States
      • The National Government
      • Some Success . . .
      • . . . And Some Problems
      • Secrecy
    • The Constitutional Convention
      • 1. How Much Power to the People?
      • 2. National Government Versus State Government
      • 3. Big States Versus Small States
        • The Virginia Plan
        • The New Jersey Plan
        • The Connecticut Compromise
      • 4. The President
        • Committee or Individual?
        • The Electoral College
        • The President: Too Strong or Too Weak?
      • 5. Separation of Powers
      • 6. “A Principle of Which We Were Ashamed”
        • The Three-Fifths Compromise
        • The Slave Trade
        • Fugitive Slaves
        • “The National Calamity”
    • An Overview of the Constitution
      • Preamble
      • Article 1: Congress
      • Article 2: The President
      • Article 3: The Courts
      • Article 4: Relations Between the States
      • Article 5: Amendments
      • Article 6: The Law of the Land
      • Article 7: Ratification
      • The Missing Articles
    • Ratification
      • The Anti-Federalists
      • The Federalists
      • Two Strong Arguments
      • A Very Close Vote
      • A Popular Surge Propels People into Politics
    • Changing the Constitution
      • The Bill of Rights
      • The Seventeen Amendments
      • The Constitution Today
    • Conclusion: Does the Constitution Still Work?
    • CHAPTER SUMMARY
    • KEY TERMS
    • STUDY QUESTIONS
  • 4 Federalism and Nationalism
    • Forging Federalism
    • Who Holds Government Authority?
      • Advantages of State-Level Policy
      • The Advantages of National Policy
    • How Federalism Works
      • The Constitution Sets the Ground Rules
        • The Constitution Empowers National Authority
        • The Constitution Protects State Authority
        • The Constitution Authorizes Shared Power
      • Dual Federalism (1789–1933)
      • Cooperative Federalism (1933–1981)
      • New Federalism
      • Progressive Federalism
        • Education
        • Healthcare
      • Federalism Today
    • Issues in Federalism
      • Unfunded Mandates
      • The Problems We Face: How Government Grows
      • Drowned in the Bathtub? Reducing the Federal Government
      • On Both Sides of the Issue
      • In a Nutshell: Our Three-Dimensional Political Chess
    • Federalism in the Courts
    • Nationalism, American Style
      • The Rise of American Nationalism
      • America’s Weak National Government
        • Size
        • Authority
        • Independence
    • Conclusion: Who Are We?
    • CHAPTER SUMMARY
    • KEY TERMS
    • STUDY QUESTIONS
  • 5 Civil Liberties
    • The Rise of Civil Liberties
      • Civil Rights and Civil Liberties
      • The Purpose of Civil Liberties
      • The Slow Rise of Civil Liberties
    • Privacy
      • “Penumbras” and “Emanations”
        • Roe v. Wade
        • Planned Parenthood v. Casey
      • Sex Between Consenting Adults
      • Clashing Principles
    • Freedom of Religion
      • The Establishment Clause
      • Free Exercise of Religion
    • Freedom of Speech
      • A Preferred Position
      • Political Speech
      • Symbolic Speech
      • Limits to Free Speech: Fighting Words
      • Limited Protections: Student Speech
    • Freedom of the Press
      • Prior Restraint
      • Obscenity
      • Libel
    • The Right to Bear Arms
      • A Relic of the Revolution?
      • The Palladium of All Liberties?
    • The Rights of the Accused
      • The Fourth Amendment: Search and Seizure
      • The Fifth Amendment: Rights at Trials
      • The Sixth Amendment: The Right to Counsel
      • The Eighth Amendment: The Death Penalty
    • Terrorism, Non-Citizens, and Civil Liberties
      • Contacts with Forbidden Groups
      • Surveillance
      • The Rights of Non-Citizens
    • Conclusion: The Dilemma of Civil Liberties
    • CHAPTER SUMMARY
    • KEY TERMS
    • STUDY QUESTIONS
  • 6 The Struggle for Civil Rights
    • Winning Rights: The Political Process
      • Seven Steps to Political Equality
      • How the Courts Review Cases
        • Suspect Categories
        • Quasi-Suspect Categories
        • Nonsuspect Categories
    • Race and Civil Rights: Revolt Against Slavery
      • The Clash over Slavery
        • Abolition
        • Economics
        • Politics
        • Dred Scott v. Sandford
      • The Second American Founding: A New Birth of Freedom?
      • Freedom Fails
    • The Fight for Racial Equality
      • Two Types of Discrimination
      • The Modern Civil Rights Campaign Begins
      • The Courts
      • The Civil Rights Movement
      • Congress and the Civil Rights Act
      • Divisions in the Movement
    • The Post Civil Rights Era
      • Affirmative Action in the Workplace
      • Affirmative Action in Education
    • Women’s Rights
      • Suffrage
      • The Civil Rights Act of 1964
      • Equal Rights Amendment
      • The Courts
      • Progress for Women—But How Much?
    • Hispanics
      • Challenging Discrimination
      • The Politics of Immigration
        • Ancient Fears
        • Three Categories
        • Undocumented Individuals
      • Language Controversy: Speak English!
      • Political Mobilization
    • Asian Americans
    • Native Americans
      • The Lost Way of Life
      • Indians and the Federal Government
      • Social Problems and Politics
      • Native Americans and the Courts
    • Groups Without Special Protection
      • People with Disabilities
      • Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity
    • The Fight for Civil Rights Goes On
      • Voting Rights Today
      • Economic and Social Rights Today
        • Health
        • Income
        • Incarceration
    • Conclusion: Civil Rights . . . By the People
    • CHAPTER SUMMARY
    • KEY TERMS
    • STUDY QUESTIONS
  • 7 Public Opinion
    • Sources of Public Opinion
      • Political Socialization
        • Parents and Friends
        • Education
        • Gender
        • Race
        • Religion
        • Life Events
      • Party
      • Self-Interest: Voting Our Pocketbooks
      • Elite Influence
      • Wars and Other Focusing Events
    • Measuring Public Opinion
      • Polling Bloopers
      • Polling 101
        • The Random Sample
        • Sampling Frame
        • Refining the Sample
        • Timing
        • Wording
        • Lies, Damn Lies, and Polls
        • Technology and Error
        • Sampling Error and Response Bias
        • How Did They Do?
      • Do Opinion Surveys Influence Us?
    • Public Opinion in a Democracy
      • Ignorant Masses
      • The Rational Public
    • Public Opinion and Governing
      • Do the People Know What They Want?
      • How Do the People Communicate Their Desires?
      • Do Leaders Respond to Public Opinion?
    • Conclusion: Government by the People
    • CHAPTER SUMMARY
    • KEY TERMS
    • STUDY QUESTIONS
  • 8 Political Participation
    • How We Participate
      • Traditional Participation
        • Voting
        • Electoral Activities
        • Political Voice
      • Civic Voluntarism
      • Direct Action
      • The Participation Puzzle
    • Why People Get Involved
      • Background: Age, Wealth, and Education
        • Age
        • Wealth
        • Education
        • Race
      • Friends and Family
      • Community
      • Political Mobilization
      • Government Beneficiaries
      • Historical Context
    • What Discourages Political Participation?
      • Alienation
      • Institutional Barriers
      • Complacency
      • Shifting Mobilization Patterns
    • New Avenues for Participation: The Internet, Social Media, and the Millennial Generation
      • Scenario 1: Rebooting Democracy
      • Scenario 2: More Hype and Danger Than Democratic Renaissance
      • Does Social Media Increase Political Participation?
      • How the Millennial Generation Participates
    • Conclusion
    • CHAPTER SUMMARY
    • KEY TERMS
    • STUDY QUESTIONS
  • 9 Media, Technology, and Government
    • Media and American Democracy
      • Providing Information
      • Watching Political Leaders
      • Shaping the Political Agenda
    • U.S. Media Today: Traditional Formats Are Declining
      • Where People Go for News
      • Newspapers and Magazines: Rise and Decline
      • Radio Holds Steady
      • Television: From News to Infotainment
        • The Rise of Cable
        • Infotainment
    • The Rise of the New Media
    • Is the Media Biased?
      • Are Reporters Politically Biased?
      • Profits Drive the News Industry
      • Drama Delivers Audiences
      • Investigative “Bias”
      • The Fairness Bias
    • How Governments Shape the Media
      • The First Amendment Protects Print Media from Regulation
      • Regulating Broadcasters
      • Protecting Competition
    • Media Around the World
      • Government-Owned Stations
      • Censorship
      • American Media in the World
    • Understanding the Media in Context: War, Terrorism, and U.S. Elections
      • Covering Wars and Terrorism
      • The Campaign as Drama
      • Candidate Profiles
    • Conclusion: At the Crossroads of the Media World
    • CHAPTER SUMMARY
    • KEY TERMS
    • STUDY QUESTIONS
  • 10 Campaigns and Elections
    • How Democratic Are American Elections?
      • Frequent and Fixed Elections
      • Over 520,000 Elected Officials
      • Barriers to Voting
      • Financing Campaigns: The New Inequality?
        • Too Much Money?
        • Democracy for the Rich?
        • Major Donors: Easier to Give
    • Presidential Campaigns and Elections
      • Who Runs for President?
      • The Three Phases of Presidential Elections
      • Winning the Nomination
      • Organizing the Convention
      • The General Election
      • Winning Presidential Elections
        • The Economy
        • Demographics
        • War and Foreign Policy
        • Domestic Issues
        • The Campaign Organization
        • Parties Matter
        • The Electoral College and Swing States
        • That Elusive Winning Recipe
      • Predicting Presidential Elections
    • Congressional Elections
      • Candidates: Who Runs for Congress?
      • The Power of Incumbency
      • Patterns in Congressional Elections
      • Redrawing the Lines: The Art of the Gerrymander
      • Nonpartisan Districting and Minority Representation
    • Congressional Campaigns
      • Candidate-Centered Elections
      • How to Run for Congress
        • Key 1: Money
        • Key 2: Organization
        • Key 3: Strategy
        • Key 4: Message
    • Conclusion: Reforming American Elections
    • CHAPTER SUMMARY
    • KEY TERMS
    • STUDY QUESTIONS
  • 11 Political Parties
    • Political Parties and U.S. Government
      • What the Parties Do
        • Parties Champion Ideas
        • Parties Select Candidates
        • Parties Mobilize the Voters
        • Parties Organize Governing Activity After the Election
        • Parties Help Integrate New Groups into the Political Process
      • Two-Party America
      • Third Parties in American Politics
    • America’s Party Systems: Origins and Change
      • Beginnings: First Party System (1789–1828)
      • Rise: Second Party System (1828–1860)
      • War and Reconstruction: Third Party System (1860–1896)
      • Business and Reform: Fourth Party System (1896–1932)
      • Depression and the New Deal: Fifth Party System (1933–1968)
      • The Sixth Party System: Parties at Parity (1969–Present)
      • Why the Party Period Matters
    • Party Identification . . . and Ideas
      • Building Party Identification
      • The Power of Party Attachment
        • Voting/Participation
        • Filtering
        • Ideology
      • Republican Factions
        • Populists or Trumpists
        • Religious Traditionalists
        • Fiscal Conservatives
        • Libertarians
        • Neoconservatives
        • Moderates
      • Democratic Factions
        • Progressives
        • The Civil Rights Caucus
        • Organized Labor
        • Centrists
      • Organizing the Parties
        • The Party Bureaucracy
        • Party in Government
        • Party in the Electorate
        • The Big Tent
    • Party Competition . . . and Partisanship
      • Parties Rise Again
      • Competition and Partisanship Intensifies
    • Conclusion: A Party System Ripe for Reform?
      • 1. Proportional Representation
      • 2. Reduce the Barriers to Third-Party Competition in Elections
      • 3. Reduce Partisanship in Government
    • CHAPTER SUMMARY
    • KEY TERMS
    • STUDY QUESTIONS
  • 12 Interest Groups
    • Interest-Group Roles in American Politics
      • Informing Members
      • Communicating Members’ Views
      • Mobilizing the Public
      • What Do Interest Groups Do for Democracy?
    • Types of Interest Groups
      • Economic Groups
      • Citizen or Public Interest Groups
      • Intergovernmental and Reverse Lobbying
    • Interest Groups Past and Present
      • 1960s Advocacy Explosion
      • Young and Plugged In
    • Interest-Group Lobbyists in Action
      • The Multiple Roles of Lobbyists
        • Researchers
        • Witnesses
        • Position Takers
        • Coalition Builders
        • Social Butterflies
        • Grassroots Campaign Builders
      • Three Types of Group Representatives
      • Nonprofits Don’t Lobby?
    • Interest Groups and the Federal Branches of Government
      • Rise of the Issue Network
      • Interest Groups and the Courts
        • Lobbying on Judicial Confirmations
        • Filing Amicus Curiae (“Friend of Court”) Briefs
        • Sponsoring Litigation
    • Interest Groups and Power
      • Interest Group Spending
      • Regulating Interest Groups
    • Are Interest Groups Bad or Good for America?
      • Four Concerns About Interest Groups
        • 1. Corruption
        • 2. Division and Hyperpluralism
        • 3. Accountability
        • 4. Restricted Access
      • Four Defenses of Interest Groups
        • 1. More Democratic Representation
        • 2. Communication and Information
        • 3. Mobilizing and Organizing the Public
        • 4. Stability
    • Conclusion: Interest-Group Influence Revisited
    • CHAPTER SUMMARY
    • KEY TERMS
    • STUDY QUESTIONS
  • 13 Congress
    • Introducing Congress
      • Two Chambers, Different Styles
      • The House and Senate Each Has Unique Roles
    • Congressional Representation
      • Does Congress Reflect America?
      • Trustees and Delegates
        • Do the Right Thing
        • Do What the People Want
    • Getting to Congress—and Staying There
      • The Permanent Campaign
      • Home Style: Back in the District
      • A Government of Strangers
    • Congress at Work
      • The City on the Hill
      • Minnows and Whales: Congressional Leadership
      • House Leadership
      • Senate Leadership
      • Committees: Workhorses of Congress
      • The Enduring Power of Committees
      • Leadership and Assignments
    • Legislative Policymaking
      • Drafting a Bill
      • Submitting the Bill
      • Committee Action
        • 1. Committees Hold Hearings on Policy Topics
        • 2. Committees Prepare Legislation for Floor Consideration
        • 3. Committees Also Kill Legislation
        • 4. Committees Exercise Oversight
      • Floor Action
        • Getting to the Floor
        • On the Floor
      • The Vote
      • Conference Committee
      • Presidential Action: Separated Powers Revisited
    • Why Is Congress So Unpopular?
      • Partisan Polarization in Congress
      • Divided Government
    • Some Popular Reforms—and Their Limits
      • Limit Lobbyists
      • Educate the Public
      • The Real World of Democracy
    • Conclusion: Congress and the Challenge of Governing
    • CHAPTER SUMMARY
    • KEY TERMS
    • STUDY QUESTIONS
  • 14 The Presidency
    • Defining the Presidency
      • Defined by Controversy
      • The President’s Powers
    • Is the Presidency Too Powerful?
      • An Imperial Presidency?
      • A Weak Office?
    • What Presidents Do
      • Commander in Chief
      • Top Diplomat
      • The First Legislator
        • Recommending Measures
        • State of the Union
        • Presidential “Batting Average”
        • Veto
        • Signing Statements
      • Chief Bureaucrat
        • Appointments
        • Executive Orders
      • Economist in Chief
      • The Head of State
      • Party Leader
      • The Bully Pulpit: Introducing Ideas
      • The Impossible Job
    • Presidential Leadership: Success and Failure in the Oval Office
      • Managing the Public
      • Approval Ratings
      • Presidential Greatness
      • Greatness in Context: The Rise and Fall of Political Orders
        • Step 1: A New Order Rises
        • Step 2: The Order Refreshed
        • Step 3: The Old Order Crumbles
    • The Personal Presidency
      • Presidential Style
      • The Burden of the Office
    • The President’s Team: A Tour of the White House
      • The Political Solar System: Presidential Appointments
      • The Vice President
      • The Cabinet
      • The Executive Office of the President
        • The Office of Management and Budget (OMB)
        • The Council of Economic Advisers (CEA)
        • The National Security Council (NSC)
      • The Heart of Power: The White House Office (WHO)
      • The First Spouse
    • Conclusion: The Most Powerful Office on Earth?
    • CHAPTER SUMMARY
    • KEY TERMS
    • STUDY QUESTIONS
  • 15 Bureaucracy
    • How the Bureaucracy Grew
      • Birth of the Bureaucracy
        • War
        • Morality
        • Economics
        • Geography
        • Race/Ethnicity
      • The Bureaucratic Model
        • Hierarchy
        • Division of Labor
        • Fixed Routines
        • Equal Rules for All
        • Technical Qualifications
      • Bureaucratic Pathologies
      • The Democratic Dilemma
    • How Bureaucracies Work
      • Rulemaking
      • Implementation
    • How the Bureaucracy Is Organized
      • The Cabinet Departments
        • The Challenge of Governing
        • Cabinet Meetings
        • The Rotating Bureaucracy
        • The Cabinet and Diversity
      • Other Agencies
        • Executive Agencies
        • Independent Regulatory Commissions
        • An Army of Their Own
        • Private Contractors
    • Who Controls the Federal Bureaucracy?
      • The People
      • The President
      • Congress
      • Interest Groups
      • Bureaucratic Autonomy
      • Democracy Revisited
    • Reforming the Bureaucracy
      • Critiques
        • Cost
        • Inertia
        • Public Mistrust
      • Reforms
        • Open Up the System
        • Reinventing Government
        • Privatization
    • Conclusion: The Real Solution Lies with You
    • CHAPTER SUMMARY
    • KEY TERMS
    • STUDY QUESTIONS
  • 16 The Judicial Branch
    • Who Are We? A Nation of Laws . . . and Lawyers
      • Embracing the Law—and Lawsuits
      • Trust in Courts
      • Courts in American Culture
    • Organizing the Judicial Branch
      • Divided We Rule
      • State and Local Courts
      • Judicial Selection
      • Federal Courts
      • Specialized Courts
      • Diversity in the Federal Judiciary
    • The Court’s Role
      • Judicial Review
      • Activism Versus Restraint
      • The Judicial Process
      • Too Much Power?
      • . . . Or Still the “Least Dangerous” Branch?
    • The Supreme Court and How It Operates
      • Hearing Cases
      • Selecting Cases: Formal Requirements
      • Selecting Cases: Informal Factors
      • Conference Sessions and Written Decisions
      • Supreme Court Clerks
      • Confirmation Battles
    • Judicial Decision Making and Reform
      • The Role of Law
      • Ideology and Partisanship
      • Collegiality and Peer Pressure
      • Institutional Concerns
    • Nineteen Cases You Should Know
      • 1. Marbury v. Madison (1803)
      • 2. McCulloch v. Maryland (1819)
      • 3. Dred Scott v. Sandford (1857)
      • 4. Santa Clara Co. v. Southern Pacific Railroad (1886)
      • 5. Plessy v. Ferguson (1896)
      • 6. Lochner v. New York (1905)
      • 7. Muller v. Oregon (1908)
      • 8. Schenck v. United States (1919)
      • 9. National Labor Relations Board v. Jones and Laughlin Steel Corporation (1937)
      • 10. Korematsu v. U.S. (1944)
      • 11. Brown v. Board of Education (1954)
      • 12. Mapp v. Ohio (1961)
      • 13. Gideon v. Wainwright (1963)
      • 14. Lemon v. Kurtzman (1971)
      • 15. Roe v. Wade (1973)
      • 16. U.S. v. Nixon (1974)
      • 17. Bush v. Gore (2000)
      • 18. National Federation of Independent Business v. Sebelius (2012)
      • 19. Obergefell v. Hodges (2015)
      • The Nineteen Cases—and the Power of the Court
    • Improving the Judiciary
      • Criticisms
      • Ideas for Reform: More Resources
      • Term Limits
      • Shift Authority to Congress
    • Conclusion: Democracy and the Courts
    • CHAPTER SUMMARY
    • KEY TERMS
    • STUDY QUESTIONS
  • 17 Public Policymaking and Budgeting
    • Public Policymaking in Five (Not-So-Easy) Stages
      • 1. Agenda Setting
      • 2. Framing
      • 3. Policy Formation
        • Analyzing Policy, Ex Ante
        • From Cost-Benefit Analysis to Politics
      • 4. Policy Implementation
        • Rulemaking Revisited
        • Top-Down Delivery
        • Bottom-Up Delivery
      • 5. Policy Evaluation and Feedback
        • Ex Post Policy Evaluations
        • A Case in Point: Gang Violence
        • Policy Feedback
    • U.S. Social Policy
      • Wars and Social Policy
      • Old-Age Insurance: Social Security
      • Unemployment Benefits
      • Health and Disability: Medicare/Medicaid
    • Economic Policymaking: Fiscal and Monetary Policy
      • Fiscal Policy
      • Monetary Policy
    • Economic Policymaking: The Federal Budget Process
      • President’s Budget Proposal
      • Congressional Budget Resolution
      • Reign of the Cardinals: Appropriations Committee Action
    • Making Good Policy
      • Moral Policies: Justice or Democracy?
      • Economically Efficient Policies
      • Capitalism Goes to the Movies
    • Reforming U.S. Policymaking
      • Systemic Reform
      • Policy Entrepreneurs
      • Eight Steps to Successful Policy Reform
        • It takes Passion
        • Act with Speed
        • Bring a Plan
        • Mind the Symbols
        • Have a Philosophy
        • Go Public
        • Know the Rules
        • Learn How to Lose
    • Conclusion: Policy Matters
    • CHAPTER SUMMARY
    • KEY TERMS
    • STUDY QUESTIONS
  • 18 Foreign Policy
    • American Foreign-Policy Goal No. 1: Security
      • Military Primacy
      • Basis for Primacy: Realism
      • A Different View: Liberalism
      • Soft Power
      • Foreign Aid and National Security
    • American Foreign-Policy Goal No. 2: Prosperity
      • Economic Superpower or Nation in Decline?
      • Free Trade
      • Challenges to Free Trade
      • Energy
      • Economic Weapons
    • Foreign-Policy Goal No. 3: Spreading American Ideals
      • American Exceptionalism
      • The View from Abroad
    • Foreign-Policy Perspectives
      • Engage the World? Isolationism Versus Intervention
      • Go It Alone or Act with Others?
      • Four Approaches
    • Who Makes Foreign Policy?
      • Congress
      • The President
      • The State Department
      • The Department of Defense
      • Intelligence
      • The National Security Council
      • Other Executive Agencies
      • Interest Groups and the Public
      • Fragmentation or Success?
    • Adding All of It Up: Grand Strategies in U.S. History
      • Standing Alone (1918–1939)
      • The Cold War (1945–1991)
      • The New World Order (1989–2001)
      • The War on Terror (2001–2009)
    • Conclusion: The Next Grand Strategy
    • CHAPTER SUMMARY
    • KEY TERMS
    • STUDY QUESTIONS
  • APPENDIX I: The Declaration of Independence
  • APPENDIX II: The Constitution of the United States of America
  • APPENDIX III: The Federalist Papers nos. 1, 10, and 51
  • Glossary
  • Notes
  • Credits
  • Index
  • Presidential Elections, Congressional Control, 1789–2019

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Þú getur nálgast allar raf(skóla)bækurnar þínar á einu augabragði, hvar og hvenær sem er í bókahillunni þinni. Engin taska, enginn kyndill og ekkert vesen (hvað þá yfirvigt).

Auðvelt að fletta og leita
Þú getur flakkað milli síðna og kafla eins og þér hentar best og farið beint í ákveðna kafla úr efnisyfirlitinu. Í leitinni finnur þú orð, kafla eða síður í einum smelli.

Glósur og yfirstrikanir
Þú getur auðkennt textabrot með mismunandi litum og skrifað glósur að vild í rafbókina. Þú getur jafnvel séð glósur og yfirstrikanir hjá bekkjarsystkinum og kennara ef þeir leyfa það. Allt á einum stað.

Hvað viltu sjá? / Þú ræður hvernig síðan lítur út
Þú lagar síðuna að þínum þörfum. Stækkaðu eða minnkaðu myndir og texta með multi-level zoom til að sjá síðuna eins og þér hentar best í þínu námi.



Fleiri góðir kostir
- Þú getur prentað síður úr bókinni (innan þeirra marka sem útgefandinn setur)
- Möguleiki á tengingu við annað stafrænt og gagnvirkt efni, svo sem myndbönd eða spurningar úr efninu
- Auðvelt að afrita og líma efni/texta fyrir t.d. heimaverkefni eða ritgerðir
- Styður tækni sem hjálpar nemendum með sjón- eða heyrnarskerðingu
Eiginleikar

Umsagnir

Engar umsagnir
Lesa fleiri umsagnir
6.990 kr.